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Full text of "Elchanite (Brooklyn, New York, N.Y.), 1959"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/elchanitebrookly1959unse 





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PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF 

YESHIVA UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL 
Brooklyn 

2270 Church Avenue, Brooklyn 26, New York 



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r)')^'o'r):h tin^j-iv:)ni 




"PEACE" 

World peace — peace of mind . . . 
Aspirations of mankind since time began 

Yet, never attained! 
Is it unattainable? 
Beyond our ken? — perhaps. 
But if we stop seeking it 
All hope is gone, and with it, 
Our excuse for being. 

by S. HORWITZ 



contents 



2 


DEDICATION 


4 


STAFF 


6 


SCHOOL 


7 


ADMINISTRATION 


8 


TALMUD FACULTY 


10 


HIGH SCHOOL FACULTY 


17 


SENIORS 


42 


DIARY 


50 


Honors 


51 


ACTIVITIES 


52 


G.O. 


55 


Student Court 


56 


Service Squad 


58 


Chagigas 


60 


Variety Nite 


62 


Y.O.C. 


63 


Kolenu 


64 


Topics 


65 


Bulletin 


66 


Arista 


68 


Library 


70 


Debating 


72 


Varsity 


74 


J.V. 


75 


Intramurals 


76 


Budding Sports 


78 


Swimming 


79 


A tom 


80 


Co-op 


81 


LITERATURE 


82 


Peace Through Education - By David Zomick 


84 


Battleground — By Martin Kellman 


85 


One Year Later — By Melvin Sinowitz 


86 


Ph.D. - By Charles Cantor 


87 


No Mourners for Eban - By Stanley Horwitz 


88 


Pax Et Bellum - By Charles Cantor 


90 


No Moon Tonight — By Saul Helfenbein 


92 


Robbery — By Edward Lowenstein 


94 


The Dreamer's End? - By Edward Lowenstein 




Bar-Room Episode — By Edward Lowenstein 


95 


Time The Tyrant - By Walter Reich 




Epitaph For Joe — By Stanley Horwitz 


96 


Why? - By David Epstein 




The Promised Land — By David Epstein 




In Search O/ ... - By Walter Reich 


97 


ADVERTISEMENTS 


122 


SENIOR DIRECTORY 



FREDERICK PASSEY 
WILLIAM R. CREMER 
BERTHA VON SUTTNER 
THEODORE ROOSEVELT 
ERNESTO T. MONETA 
AUGUSTE BEERNAERT 
HENRI LA FONTAINNE 
KARL H. BRANTING 
CHRISTIAN L. LANGE 
FRIDTJOF NANSEN 
AUSTEN CHAMBERLAIN 
ARISTIDE BRIAND 
GUSTAVE STRESEMANN 
FERDINAND BUISSON 
FRANK R. KELLOG 
LARS SODERBLOM 
NICHOLAS M. BUTLER 
SIR NORMAN ANGELL 
ARTHUR HENDERSON 
CARL VON OSSIETSKY 
CARLOS DE LAMAS 
LORD JOHN BOYD ORR 
RALPH J. BUNCHE 
ALBERT SCHWEITZER 
GEORGE C. MARSHALL 
FREDERICK PASSEY 
WILLIAM R. CREMER 
BERTHA VON SUHNER 
THEODORE ROOSEVELT 
ERNESTO T. MONETA 
AUGUSTE BEERNAERT 
HENRI LA FONTAINNE 
KARL H. BRANTING 
CHRISTIAN L. LANGE 
FRIDTJOF NANSEN 
AUSTEN CHAMBERLAIN 
ARISTIDE BRIAND 
GUSTAVE STRESEMANN 
FERDINAND BUISSON 
FRANK R. KELLOG 
LARS SODERBLOM 
NICHOLAS M. BUTLER 
SIR NORMAN ANGELL 
ARTHUR HENDERSON 

NOBEL PEACE PRIZE WINNERS 





Lejt to right: H. Leibowitz, Art Editor, Alex Flamholz, Editor-in-Chief, 
A. Wolfish, Co-Editor, Mr. H. Allan, Faculty Advisor, M. Meshenberg, 
Art Editor, H. Adelman, Editor-in-Chief, E. Lowenstein, Co-Editor. 





Left to right: A. Rosner, D. Goldkrantz. D. Resnick, M. Gottesman, 
Business Managers. 



Left to right: L. Wachsman, 
J. Werblowsky, Typing Editors 





Left to right: D. Zomick, S. Horwitz, Literary Editors. 




Left to right: M. Shapiro, 

J. Berkowitz, Photography Editors. 



Left to right: C. Cantor, H. Fruchter, 
J. Leibowitz, M. Kellman, Activities Editors. 




t h e $ C HO L 





Dr. Samuel Belkin, President 

YESHIVA UNIVERSITY 



Mr. Samuel Levine, Director Rabbi Abraham N. Zuroff, Principal 



Dr. Shelley R. Saphire, Supervisor, 

YESHIVA UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOLS 



ADMINISTRATION 








Pt V 


Cx 


j^^ 




^:W 


'^tW 


Rabbi Samuel Fink 


Rabbi Pincus Shebshaievitz 



ta\mud 




Rabbi Peretz Yogel, 
Talmud Examiner 




Rabbi Hyman Heifitz 







Rabbi Wolf Durchin 












is 


• 


c 




Rabbi Joseph Epstein 


Rabbi Zelo Schussheim 


Rabbi Samuel Shmidman 


Rabbi Samuel Faivushevitz 




c3i^^' 




Rabbi Harold Kanotopsky 




Rabbi Herman Frankel 



^ 9^) f^ 




Rabbi Meyer Karlin 




THE instruction and guidance of the English 
staff have combined to make English one of 
the more interesting and profitable courses given 
in our school. Instruction in grammar, usage, 
composition, and American and English litera- 
ture are all part of the vast and varied program 
taught to us by our efficient and capable English 
department. 

The excellent achievements of the students on 
both the College Board and Regent Scholarship 
examinations may be attributed to their distin- 
guished tutelage. 



Mr. Joseph B. Strum 



english 






Dr. Max Horwitz* Deceased 



Mr. Josef Brand 



Mr. Sidney Gold 





Mr. Robert E. Bassell 



Mr. Simon Lippner 



10 



languages 



Rabbi Yaakov Dardac 





Dr. Jechiel Lichtenstein 




Mr. Isaac J. Cantor 



A NOTHER part of the prescribed course of 
'» study is foreign languages which include 
Hebrew, French and Spanish. Of the three, each 
student must take four years of Hebrew and two 
years of either French or Spanish. Our excellent 
language instructors are being rewarded by the 
increasing popularity of their courses among the 
student body. 





Mr. Francis Callan 



Mr. Jacob Soshuk 



11 




Mr. Morris Septimus 



AN avid interest in mathematics has been in- 
> stilled in our students by the varied methods 
and techniques employed by the Mathematics 
Department. Our many capable instructors are 
drawn from several fine schools, bringing with 
them abilities which can only be gained by years 
of experience. 

Elementary Algebra, Tenth Year Math, Inter- 
mediate Algebra, Trigonometry, Advanced Alge- 
bra and a college course in calculus and analytic 
geometry make up the gamut of instruction taught 
by the Math Department. Two and a half years 
of mathematics are required, but most students 
receive full advantage of the math curriculum by 
taking the entire four year course. 




mathematics 




Mr. Louis Cooper 



Mr. Milton Spin instructs trigonometry class. 





Mr. Harry Goldstein 




Biology lesson delivered by Mr. David Schiff. 



science 





Mr. Samuel Lebowitz 



LABORATORY work forms an integral part of 
all the subjects taught by our Science De- 
partment. These courses consist of General 
Science, Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. Of the 
four, General Science and Biology are required 
by students for graduation. Chemistry and Phys- 
ics are available to students as electives. It is 
gratifying to note that the elective science courses 
are becoming more and more in demand by the 
student body. 




Mr. George Davidson 



13 



social studies 




Mr. Arthur Becker 



INSTRUCTION in Economics, World and 
American History, Citizenship Education, and 
World Geography are all part of the interesting 
and benefiting three and a half year Social Studies 
course. 

This past year has seen the addition of a very 
fine teacher in the way of Mr. Becker, to our 
growing Social Studies Department. Mr. Martin 
Lilker, a well known and well liked member of 
our Social Studies staff for ten years, will be 
leaving us at the end of the term. 




Mr. Martin Lilker 




Mr. Isidore Melov 



Mr. Morris Purcell 

1 





THE minor subjects in our curriculum consists 
of music, art and physical education. All stu- 
dents are required to take each of the courses 
for two years. In the first, an appreciation of 
music is developed in the student while basic 
terms are acquired by him. Fundamentals of 
design and color, and the history of the subject 
are stressed in art, while physical education pro- 
vides instruction in basic sports. 



art 



Mr. Harry Allan 




physical 
education 



music 




Mr. Harry Morse 



Mr. Leon Leibowitz 



guidance 



THE Guidance Department, under the capable 
direction of Mr. Martin Lilker, plays an im- 
portant role in the orientation of freshman and 
sophomores, and has performed the important 
function of helping juniors and seniors in their 
choice of college and vocation. After four years 
and a well done job as Guidance Counselor, Mr. 
Lilker is relinquishing his position. 



Mr. Martin Lilker 





Lefl to right: Mrs. Harriet Hochdorf, Secretary, 
H. Adelman, M. Unterberg, Student Assistants. 




Mrs. Yetta Rosenman, 
Secretary. 

"Their active interest in students and their 
' willingness to assist them in either an official 
or unofficial capacity has endeared Mrs. Yetta 
Rosenman, secretary to the principal, and Mr. 
Jacob Blazer, office manager, to the entire stu- 
dent body. Mrs. Rosenman has always been 
available to help the student with advice on 
personal problems. Assisting Mr. Blazer in the 
executive office is Mrs. Hochdorf, secretary. 



Pfc. Jacob Blazer, 
Assistant Director. 



/^UR chief custodian, Mr. John Santiago, 
^^ better known as "John," is responsible for 
maintaining the physical appearance and cleanli- 
ness of our school building. John's food conces- 
sion, mainly due to his popularity, has become 
a center of student activity. 




Mr. John Santiago, 
Chief Custodian. 



16 



^ 





£1 




S E N I R S 



17 





HARVEY ABRAMOWITZ 

Class Debating Team 3, 4; Service Squad 3-6; 
Library Squad, 7, 8; Varsity Manager 7. 8; 
Topics Business Staff 5, 6. 

Manager of the Varsity. Harv regularly 
frequented the Kenmore Alleys. An avid bas- 
ketball fan, he was one of the steady ball- 
handlers in the schoolyard. He will keep 
"on-the-go" at Yeshiva where he'll prepare 
for a career in aeronautical engineering. 

"Could manage this matter to a T." 

L. Sterne 



HERBERT ADELMAN 

Elchanite Editor-in-Chief 7, 8: Elchanite Art 
Squad 1-8; Class Sec'y-Treas 6; Service Squad 
Lieutenant 7; Office Squad Head 6, 7; Kolenu 
Art 6. 

Eleventeen terms on the Elchanite squad. 
Herb made art his life at YUHSB. His model 
dream house and devoted service to Mr. 
Allan's Elchanite art crew are notable exam- 
ples of the success he achieved. Only member 
of the class who was in school in summertime 
(working in the office, of course), he will build 
his future m architecture at Pratt. 

"Build thee more stately mansions." 

Holmes 



ABRAHAM AUFRICHTIG 

Class Intramurals 4-7. 

Our transferee from Torah Vadaas, Abe 
proved his worth in his jump from Rabbi Kar- 
lin's shiur to Rabbi Yogel's. A good natured 
and competent fellow, he intends to enter 
medicine after studying at Yeshiva. 

"Industry in art is a necessity." 

Whistler 



Recess in the yard 






Waiting for next 



JOEL BERKOWITZ 

Head Librarian 7, 8; Class Debating Team 
2-6; Manager 7; Elchanite Photography Edi- 
tor 7, 8; Swimming Team 7; Office Squad 6. 

First in the class to become a "good man," 
Berky has switched since then from tropical 
fish to photography. His love for animals will 
doubtless assist "Pudgy" in his career as a 
veterinarian. He will prepare for it as a pre- 
med. 

"I think I could turn and live with animals— 
they are so placid and self-contain'd." 

Whitman 






NORMAN BERSSON 

Service Squad 1-4; Class Debating Team 4, 5; 
JV Basketball 3, 4; Varsity Basketball 5-8; 
Swimming Team 5, 6. 

Norm, known as Phil to some other teachers, 
followed the Bersson pattern quite closely. To 
their other athletic activities he added swim- 
ming and to classes he added confusion. One of 
the "never-a-dull-moment" boys of Doc's class, 
he will brush bicuspids with Bersson #1 at 
Queens next year. 

"Happiness was born a twin." 

Byron 



PHILLIP BERSSON 

Service Squad 1, 2; Class Athletic Manager 
1, 2, 5, 7; JV Basketball 3, 4; Varsity Basket- 
ball 5-8; Class Debating Team 5. 

Phil, known as Norm to some of his teachers, 
could never decide whether to walk to the 
bowling alley or to Central. Used to working 
in a team (Bersson & Bersson), he easily fit 
into Varsity basketball and service squad. 
He'll clean teeth at Queens for a few years 
before going into dentistry. 

"Double, double, goils and trouble. " 

butchered from Shakespeare 



19 





RAY BLOCH 

Varsity Debating Team 1-8; Class Debating 
Manager 2-8; Topics Photography Editor 5-8; 
Arista President 7; Kolenu Staff 3-6. 

General Flash Bloch was Chairman and 
Secretary of the PBG. His "study periods" in 
301 helped him achieve the highest average in 
the class. Perennial class debating manager, 
Ray will take his oratory and darkroom up to 
Yeshiva where he will prefix "Dr." to his title. 

"Speak the truth and shame the devil." 

Cervantes 



MARTIN BRAUN 

Library Squad 3, 4; Kolenu Staff 4-6; Chess 
Team 5, 6; Recess-Lab-Squad 7, 8. 

Marty, our pyrotechnics expert, blazed a 
smoky trail in YUHSB. Spending most of his 
time in the dentist's chair or doing extensive 
research on French entertainment, he never- 
theless managed to maintain consistently good 
grades. After mastering math at Yeshiva he 
hopes to be a statistician. 

"There'll be a hot time in the old town 
tonight." 

Lola Smith 





CHARLES CANTOR 

Elchanite Activities Editor 7, 8; Class Presi- 
dent 1, 4, 6; Vice-President 2, 5; Debating 1-8: 
Arista 4-8; Vice-Leader 6; Leader 7; Topics 
News Staff 3-6; Variety Nite 7, 8. 

Driving force of the Elchanite activities 
staff. Buddy was the only senior to take the 
Chem regents in his soph year. Though not 
buddies with "everybody's buddy," he still 
managed to keep up good grades. A staunch 
hi-fi bug. Bud was instriimental in the intro- 
duction of calculus at YUHSB. He will take 
his woofers and tweeters to Columbia where 
he will continue teaching his math instructors. 

"Where there's life there's Bud." 

Anheuser Busch 



20 




Elchanite is a 24-hour-a-day job. 






NATHAN DERSHOWITZ 

School Debating Manager 6; Varsity Debating 
Team 3-8; Varsity Basketball Team 5-8; Swim- 
ming Team Captain 6; Tennis Team 5, 6; JV 
Basketball Team 3, 4. 

One of our better debaters. Tally didn't 
limit himself to the forensic art. As Captain 
of the swimming team and member of the 
Basketball and tennis Varsities, he was active 
in athletics. Friendly and personable, he will 
follow the Dershowitz trail to Brooklyn. 

"Once again the bull supreme." 

Hodgson 



ARNOLD EAGLE 

English Library Squad 3; Hebrew Library 
Squad 2-5. 

One of our commuters. Arnie Eagle flew 
through high school. He could usually be found 
working in the English- and Hebrew libraries. 
His genial manner will win him many friends 
at Hofstra next year where he will study den- 
tistry. 

"Like the Eagle free." 

Cunningham 



DAVID EPSTEIN 

Bulletin Editor-in-Chief 7, 8; Topics Copy 
Editor 5-8; Varsity Debating Team 3-8; Stu- 
dent Court Justice 7, 8; Arista 5-8; Arista 
Secretary 8; Class Debating 2-8. 

Editor of the Bulletin. Dave will be remem- 
bered for his scathing editorials written at 
odd moments of inspiration. Our journalist 
from New Jersey also excelled in debating and 
Talmud studies. He will no doubt keep up his 
good scholastic and extracurricular work at 
Y.U. in the fall. 

"I speak the truth as much as I dare." 

Montaigne 



21 




MOISHE FEDER 

Moishe. our yo-yo instructor from Canada, 
joined us in his senior year. One of Rabbi 
Yogel's "masmidim," he kept us entertained 
with his harmonica and running commentary 
on Montreal's hockey team. He will study pre- 
dent at Y.U. next year. 

"G-d save the Queen . . . and Maurice 
Richard." 

Feder 




STEVEN FEIGELSTOCK 

Service Squad 2; Class Debating Team 2, 3, 5; 
Topics Staff 5; Variety Nite Staff 3. 

One of the later additions of Rabbi Yogel's 
class, Steve was one of the pillars of the min- 
yan. Among the Doctor's finest Jewish History 
students, he is an ardent reader and Talmud 
scholar. He will study mathematics at Yeshiva 
next year. 

"More things are wrought by prayer than 
this world dreams of." 

Tennyson 




IRVING FEIGENBLUM 

Varsity Basketball 5-8; JV Basketball 3, 4; 
Bowling Team Captain 6-8; Swimming Team 
6; Track Team 6; Service Squad 4-6; Class 
Athletic Manager 5. 6; Debating Team 3-6. 

YUHSB's answer to Don Carter, "Fig" also 
distinguished himself on three other Varsity 
teams. His interest in math and friendly per- 
sonality will serve him well in his mechanical 
engineering studies at Brooklyn. 

"His soul lives in an alley." 

Ben Jonson 



Yes your majesty — no, your majesty. 






Open air staff meeting . 



MARTIN FELDMAN 

Class Sec'y-Treas. 2; Math Club 3-5; Class De- 
bating Team 4-7; Class Athletic Teams 1-4, 
6-8. 

One of our better math students, Marty, on 
his rare visits to class, managed to make his 
teachers fully aware of his presence. A charter 
member of the Fink-Kenmore class and an 
ardent proponent of co-ed education, he will 
study engineering at city. 

"Absence makes the heart grow fonder." 
T. H. Bayly 





SIMEON FENSTERHEIM 

Track Team 5, 6; Class Debating Team 3-5. 

Simeon, one of the smallest guys ever to 
win a Hausman award, managed to grow four 
inches at the end of his junior year. Member 
of the track team, his association with Mr. 
Lilker guaranteed his grades in History. His 
math studies at Y.U. will help him achieve 
his chosen profession, engineering. 

"Farmacht der Fenster un gay a-Heim." 

Rabbi Frankel 



ALEX FLAMHOLZ 

Elchanite Editor-in-Chief 7, 8; Topics News 
and Managing Editor 5-7; Class President 2, 
3, 4, 5, 7; Student Court Chief Justice 6; Mem- 
ber Justice 5; Arista 4-6; Lab Ass't 3-8. 

Ajax, nicknamed Alexander, was the propri- 
etor of our "club" locker. His journalistic 
abilities and wide popularity earned for him 
top positions on the Elchqnite and Topics. His 
cheerful disposition lent a happy air to many 
a gloomy day. Encouraged by an 800 on the 
non-verbal Boards, he will make math and 
physics his goal next year at Brooklyn. 

"It is a happy lot which finds no enemy." 
Mr. Becker 



23 






HOWARD FRUCHTER 

Elehanite Activities Editor 7. 8; Varsity Bas- 
ketball 3-8; Class President 3. 4; Debating 
Team 1-6; Athletic Manager 2. 6; Debating 
Manager 1. 

Captain of our basketball team. Howie led 
it to unprecedented heights. Recognized as the 
best ■■little" ballplayer on the MJHSL. his 
personality made it easy for him to win many 
loyal friends and rooters. He was also able to 
find time to excel in Talmud studies. Our loss 
is Yeshiva's gain. 

"It's not whether you win or lose, but how 
you play the game. " 

Forman 



ROBERT GERSTL 

Service Squad 3-5; Atom Staff 7; Office Squad 
5; Variety Nite Staff 3, 5; Tennis Team 5. 6. 

Interested in anything and everything. Bob 
has spent his four years at school with a medi- 
cal career in mind. His diligent studies and 
agreeable manner will certainly help him in 
med school. Our opera enthusiast will be at 
Brooklyn next year preparing for his goal. 

"Figaro, Figaro, Figaro." 

Mozart 



24 





OBIE GOLDBLATT 

Known by everyone for his sincere piety and 
hasmada. Obie helped bolster the Yeshiva 
spirit at school. Last on Rabbi Yogel's upcheck 
list, he will wear his flashy hat, jacket and tie 
to Brooklyn Night while learning during the 
day. 

"Your character with piety is pack'd." 

H. Graham 



Two cents is two cents. 




COMPETITION. 







DAVID GOLDKRANTZ 

Service Squad Captain 7; Class Vice-President 
1; Sec'y-Treas. 2; Elchanite Business Manager 
7, 8; Kolenu Staff 6-8; Class Debating 3-7. 

Dave, interested in all languages and one of 
the Senor's favorite pupils, learned to speak a 
"tough" language as Captain of our service 
squad. We wish him luck in his linguistic 
studies at Brooklyn. 

"Language adorned with veracity." 

Abu Mohammed Kasim ben Ali Hariri 



H\MAN GOLDKRANTZ 

Class Veep 2, 6; Debating Team 1; JV Basket- 
ball Team 5, 6; Arista 6; Bowling Team .5, 6; 
Class Athletic Manager 3. 

Representative of Brownsville, swingin' Hy 
cheered up the boys in Kenny's class with his 
general good humor. Excelling in sports, both 
intramural and JV. he mixed brains with 
brawn as an Arista member. His geniality will 
be a great asset to him at City where he'll 
study electrical engineering. 

"Hy and mighty." 

MGM 



DONALD GOLDMACHhR 

G.O. President 7; Class President 1, 3, 5; Stu- 
dent Court Justice 6; Coop Salesman 1-3; 
Manager 4-6; Service Squad 1-4; Varsity Bas- 
ketball 5. 6; Class Debating 1-8. 

Working through TA on the co-op ticket, 
Donny achieved the GO. presidency in his 
seventh term. He made notable progress in 
improving such activities as commissions and 
chagigas. His elimination of the club program 
durng his tenure was welcomed by all. Dr. 
Goldmacher will continue to further his po- 
litical and scholastic ambitions as a pre-rned 
at Brooklyn. 

"I'd rather be President than right." 

Clenry Hay 



25 






JERRY GOLDMAN 

Varsity Basketball Team 5-8; JV Basketball 
3, 4; Class Athletic Manager 3, 4. 

Tallest in the class, 6-foot-4-inch Jerry 
worked his way up to the top of the basketball 
team. Known mainly for his prowess on the 
court, he could rarely be found without a smile 
on his face. He will rebound into Hunter 
next year for a career in engineering. 

"Tall, dark, and . . . well that's two out of 
three anyway." 

Goldmanism 



JAY GOLDSTEIN 

Service Squad 5-7; Library- Squad 5, 6; Class 
Sec'y-Treas. 5, 6; Office Squad 5-7. 

Jay, a charter member of the Fink-Kenmore 
class, managed to co-exist with Doc by avoid- 
ing him as often as possible. Holder of the 
New York Times franchise in YUHSB. his 
services were greatly appreciated by many a 
bored student. He will start on the way to his 
first million as an education major at Yeshiva. 

"Keep up with the Times." 

ANZ 



MILTON GOTTESMAN 

Elchanite Business Manager 7, 8; Class 1-6; 
Class Athletic Manager 1, 2; Debating 1, 2. 

Chief Elchanite business manager, Milty 
lost a lot of sleep and weight worrying about 
yearbook finances. Interested in all things 
Hebrew, he hopes to live in Israel and partici- 
pate in Jewish politics. In preparation "Pidge" 
will attend Y.U. 

"Give him the business!" 

Editors 



Chorus rehearsal. 



26 






IRWIN HAIMS 

Office Squad 3, 4; Class Debating 3, 4; JV 
Basketball Team 5, 6. 

An enthusiastic basketball player, Irwin 
greatly improved his game through diligent 
practice on the JV and in the backyard. Mem- 
ber of the famous team, "Fink's Angels," he 
still served well on the office squad. Account- 
ing will be his field at City. 

"I'll settle accounts with you!" 

Senor Cantor 





GEROLD HALPERN 

Service Squad 2-5, 7; Class Sec'y-Treas. 8; 
Office squad 7; Variety Nite Staff 1. 

Quiet and friendly, Jerry excelled in math 
and was a serious student. We know his fine 
qualities will ensure his success as a mechani- 
cal engineer. He'll study for it at Pratt. 

"Looks on life with quiet eyes." 

F. Shaw 



LARRY HASPEL 

Class Pres. 5; Vice-President 3; Debating 1-8; 
JV Basketball 3, 4; Varsity 5-8; Track Team 
6; School Athletic Manager 6. 

Larry helped to improve our athletic pro- 
gram in his capacity as co-captain of the Var- 
sity and Athletic Manager of the school. 
Debating nemesis of Mr. Lilker, he will aim 
for an LL.B. at Brooklyn. 

"Fight team, fight!!!!" 



27 






Admits anyone? 



SAUL HELFENBEIN 

YUHSB's answer to creeping meatballism. 
Saul is an avid reader of science fiction and a 
talented short story and poetry writer. Our 
pleasant, red-headed poet laureate will major 
in English at Brooklyn. 

"What one fool can do, another can." 

Helfenbein via ancient Samaria 



STANLEY HORWITZ 

Class Vice-President 1; Debating 2-8: Arista 
5-8; Sec'y-Treas. 7; Vice-President 8; Topics 
Reporter 5, 6; Kolenu Staff 3, 4; Topics Typ- 
ing 3, 4; Elchanite Literary Editor 7, 8. 

Stan, alias Sid Silver, financed his stay at 
ETA by playing the market and"other" things. 
He cycled his way to fame in many scholar- 
ship contests. Possessor of a centrally located 
house and a sharp wit. he was popular with 
all. He will sell his literary talents, ivy league 
cap and maroon 'cycle to the highest bidder 
and study math. 



"Peddle, peddle, toil and trouble." 



Ajax 





Portrait of a senior. 



DAVID JACOBSON 

Class Debating Team 1-8; Varsity 4; Class 
Sec'y-Treas. 6; Vice-President 8; Arista 5-8; 
Vice-President 7; Chess Team 3-8; Kolenu 6. 

Always "happy-go-lucky ." Jake consistently 
kept in good spirits with a fine and prolific 
humor. Between jokes he managed to gain the 
veep-ency of the National Honor Society and 
serve on the chess and debating Varsities. His 
witticisms and rosy cheeks are sure to make 
him popular at Yeshiva next year where he'll 
major in chemistry. 

"The boy with the barrel of flavor." 

B. Piels 



28 




The joys of learning. 






MARTIN KELLMAN 

Topics Sports Editor 7, 8; Elchanite Activities 
Editor 7, 8; Chagiga 7, 8; Class Debating 1-8; 
School Debating 5-8; Varsity Scorer 5-6; Vari- 
ety Nite 5-6. 

Senor's prize Spanish student spent four 
years watching the Senor imitate him. Presi- 
dent and only member of the YUHSB branch 
of the G.O.P., he used his subtle wit to conquer 
crossword puzzles and liven up many a dull 
class. An ardent supporter of the varsity, our 
Topics Sports Editor played an important role 
in ad-libbing the chagiga skits to success. He 
will add some cheer to Brooklyn next year. 

"What's good for General Motors is good 
for the country." 

Charles Wilson 



DAVID LAZAR 

G.O. Vice-President 7; Sec'y-Treas. 5, 6; Class 
President 2, 4; Debating Team 1-6; Business 
Manager 3; JV Basketball 3, 4; Co-op Sales- 
man 3, 4; Elchariite Art 2; Service Squad 1, 2. 

Basketball was Dave's game until he en- 
tered politics. Twice elected G.O. Secretary- 
Treasurer and once Veep, Lizzy's amicable 
manner assured the smooth operation of the 
Student Council. He will forego politics for 
math at Yeshiva. 

"Politics is the doctrine of the possible, the 
attainable." 

Bismarck 



EDWARD LEIBOWITZ 

Class Debating 2-8; Sec'y-Treas. 2, 3, 4; Service 
Squad 2, 8. 

"Smilin' Ed" grinned his nonchalant way 
through four years of transit on the 23th Av- 
enue bus. A pleasant disposition his most 
valuable asset. Ed naturally won many friends. 
This future dentist will drill through his stud- 
ies at Brooklyn. 

"One vast substantial smile." 

Dickens 



29 






HAROLD LEIBOWITZ 

G.O. Vice-President 8; Sec'y-Treas. 7; Elchan- 
ite Art Editor 7, 8; Kolenu Ass't Editor 6; 
Class Vice-President 2; President 3; Athletic 
Manager 4; Track Team Captain 7, 8; Member 
3-6; JV 3. 4. 

Hesh. one of our honest politicians, served 
in two executive positions during his senior 
year. Captain of our track team and weekend 
ambassador to the Bronx, Hesh broke many a 
"jour-minute-mile" chasing the IRT. His smile 
and personality will serve him well in his his- 
tory studies at Brooklyn. 

"Not a sinner, nor a saint just the very best 
of chaps." 



JOSEPH LEIBOWITZ 

School Athletic Manager 5; Class Athletic 
Manager 1-4; Varsity Basketball 2-5; Chess 
Team 1-8; Variety Nite 5, 6; Leader 7, 8; 
Chagiga Leader 7, 8; Class Vice-President 7. 

Possessor of a torn tibial tubercle, a great 
sense of humor, and an innate power of lead- 
ership, Joey had a hand in coordinating many 
activities. Responsible for our successful cha- 
gigas and Variety Nite, he was forced by his 
injury to limit athletics to managership, rally- 
ing the varsity, and intramurals. Brooklyn's 
science department will inherit a hard worker. 

"Variety is the spice of life." 

Cowper 



ROBERT LEVINE 

Office Squad 5-7; Variety Nite Staff 5-8; Serv- 
ice Squad 5-7; Lab Ass't 5, 6. 

Bob, our expert on equestrian finances, will 
be best remembered for his faithful service as 
Mrs. Rosenman's 3rd period office emissary. 
Attendance and scratch sheets were his spe- 
cialty. Instrumental in the organization of the 
stamp club, he will take a liberal arts course 
at Brooklyn. 

"A horse, a horse— my kingdom for a horse!" 
WiUy the Shake 




30 





BERNARD LICHTENSTEIN 

G.O. Sec'y-Treas. 7; Service Squad 2-6; JV 
Captain 6; Varsity 7, 8; Office Squad 5, 6; Class 
Athletic Manager 5, 6; Class Sec'y-Treas. 3. 

Elected G.O. Secretary-Treasurer in eighth 
term. Sonny didn't confine his activities to 
politics. Mr. Becker's "Schlesinger Jr." was 
JV Captain in our junior year. Another yard 
ball-handler, he hopes to be a heart surgeon 
and will study pre-med at Brooklyn. 

"The heart of the matter." 

Graham Greene 






HOWARD LIEBMAN 

Variety Nite 1-8; Library Squad 1, 2; Class 
Intramurals 1-8. 

Howie spent four years letting his hair grow. 
Only person to receive a Hausman Award from 
Rabbi Gordon, he was known for his singing 
ability and active participation in Variety 
Nite. He will croon his way to a C.P.A. at 
Brooklyn. 

"Here are enshrined the longings of many 
hearts." 

lifted from the Brooklyn Public Library 



ABRAHAM LOSHINSKI 

Class Intramurals 1-8; Service Squad 7. 

Known affectionately as "BIG" Abe, this 
mild fellow possessed an unassuming exterior 
concealing a vibrant personality. With no ef- 
fort he both spoke little and racked up high 
grades. He will continue to amaze those who 
know him as a physics major at Yeshiva. 

"Cultivate the gift of taciturnity." 

Sir William Osier 



31 






I want a "hiishey" bar. 



EDWARD LOWENSTEIN 

Class President 6; Vice-President 1, 3, 5; De- 
bating Manager 4; Debating Team 1-8; Varsity 
Debating 2-8; Elchanite Co-Editor 7, 8. 

A wonderful person to have for a friend, our 
Elchanite co-editor is sure to succeed as long 
as Hebrew is kept out of his path. One of the 
"punnyest" guys in the class. Eddy became a 
fixture at the library in the senior year. He 
will prepare for college teaching by studying 
social science at Brooklyn. 

"I am the captain of my soul." 

Henley 



LEROY LUNDNER 

Hebrew Library Squad 1, 2; Kolenu 4-7; Serv- 
ice Squad 5, 6; Class Sec'y-Treas. 2. 

Head of the mishmar in our senior year, Lee 
was known for his conscientious work. An ex- 
cellent student in both Talmud and secular 
departments, he devoted much time to Hebrew 
library and Kolenu. He will prepare for a 
career in medicine at Y.U. 

"Knowledge comes only from study. " 

A. E. Newton 



32 





AVRUM MARCUS 

Class Vice-President 1; Debating Team 1, 3-6; 
Service Squad 1-6; Lieutenant 7; Library 
Squad 1; Newspaper M'gr 5, 6. 

Dubbed "terror of the court," Big Ave 
sported a wild hook shot and a fine wit. Out- 
standing in intramurals. he gave efficient serv- 
ice handling newspapers and the service squad 
as its lieutenant. He will pursue his career at 
Brooklyn Pharmacy. 

"G-d heals and the pharmacist takes the 
fee." 



Chickee! 







MICHAEL MESHENBERG 

Elchanite Art Editor 7, 8; Art Squad 4-8; Class 
Vice-President 4, 8; Debating Manager 7; 
Team 3-8; Service Squad 3; Hebrew Library 2. 

"Mesh," known for his jovial, friendly spirit, 
was one of our art enthusiasts. An ardent sup- 
porter of our basketball team, he also distin- 
guished himself in the many extracurrics in 
which he participated. He will continue his 
studies at Brooklyn. 

"If you want a friend that's true, I'm on 
your list." 

Robert Burns 



REUBEN MEZRICH 

"Varsity Basketball Team 5-8; JV 3, 4; Class 
Athletic Manager 7; Sec'y-Treas. 3; School 
Athletic Manager 8. 

Hailing from Dubuque, Iowa, Mez was one 
of the Varsity's rugged rebounders. His easy- 
going manner won him friends both on and 
off the court. Interested in science and at the 
head of the class in it. he will pursue electronic 
engineering at Brooklyn Poly. 

"I never think I have hit hard unless it re- 
bounds." 

BosweU 



ALFRED MUNZER 

Our linguist from Holland has studied there, 
in France, Belgium, and now, the U.S. At home 
with five other languages besides English, he 
found little difficulty catching on to "Ameri- 
canese." His amiable personality will continue 
winning him new friends at Y.U. We're sure 
he'll make a good "doktor" in any language. 

"Speaks a various language." 

Bryant 



33 






MARK NATHANSON 

Varsity Basketball 5-8; Tennis Team 5-8; 
Track Team 5-8; Bowling Team 7, 8; JV 3, 4; 
Class President 8; Debating Team 5, 8; Ath- 
letic Manager 5. 

Mickey's constant backyard practice helped 
boost him to a starting position on our suc- 
cessful Varsity. Active in other sports includ- 
ing Central, "Elimelech" impressed Rabbi 
Dardac and us as a darn nice guy. He'll aim 
for a CPA at City. 

". . . utter wisdom from the Central deep." 
Lowell 



MARVIN POLLACK 

Class President 6; Vice-President 3; Debating 
1-4, 6; Business Manager 4; Arista 4-8; Topics 
Circulation Co-Manager 5. 

Marv, our youngest member, was famous 
for joint operations with Mez. Consistently 
good in school, he spent his extracurricular 
time at Arista meetings and watching the 
clock for the Varsity. He will major in chem- 
istry at Y.U. 

"Sweet bird of youth." 

Tennessee Williams 



PAUL PUTTER 

Service Squad 6, 7, 8; Class Sec'y-Treas. 7; 
Debating Manager 8; Hebrew Library 7, 8. 

Paul came to us in his sophomore year from, 
the Lubavitcher Yeshiva. He served our min- 
yan well by "layning" the torah for them regu- 
larly. Interested in the Hebrew language and 
literature, Paul would like to continue these 
studies while pursuing engineering at City. 

"My heart is in the East; and I in the utter- 
most West." 

Judah Ha-levi 




. and thou shall teach them diligently . . ." 



34 





Who's absent? 



JOSEPH RAPAPORT 

G.O. President 8; Service Squad 1-3; Class 
Debating 3-6; Kolenu Editor-in-Chief 5, 6; 
Arista 5-8; Tennis Team Captain 7, 8; Track 
Team 1; JV5, 6. 

Last term president of the CO., Joe par- 
ticipated in a variety of activities. A chess 
enthusiast, he met many formidable oppon- 
ents including Samuel Reshevsky and Rabbi 
Zuroff. Always a defender of students' rights. 
"Rappy" will continue his career at Yeshiva 
while majoring in math. 

"School was just another extra curricular 
activity." 

Old Elchanite 






DAVID RESNICK 

Drama Society 5-8; Class Business Manager 
1-8; Debating 7. 

Our exponent of " positive-existential-noth- 
ingism." Dave was well known and feared by 
all his teachers. A voracious reader, he dis- 
played his knowledge by achieving the highest 
State Scholarship scores in the class and by 
matching wits with Bob B. His dramatic ability 
on and off the stage was put to good use as 
head of the drama society and perennial busi- 
ness manager. Math will be his prime target 
at M.I.T. 

"To be great is to be misunderstood." 

Emerson 



MICHAEL ROSENBAUM 

Variety Nite 1-8; Class Debating Manager 4; 
Debating Team 2-6; Sec'y-Treas. 2; Elchanite 
Business Manager 6; Service Squad 1; Elchan- 
ite Typing Staff 7, 8. 

Mousy, lowest tenor in the Glee Club, gave 
his nails a rough going-over when exams 
rolled around. Along with his singing, he en- 
tertained his teachers with fine scholarship. 
He will strive to suffix "M.D." to his name as 
a chem major at Brooklyn. 

"Mouse is miracle enough." 

Whitman 



35 






ALEX ROSNER 

Service Squad 3, 5, 6; Captain 7, 8; Kolenu 6; 
Elclianite Business Manager 7, 8; Photography 
Staff 6-8; Class Debating 6, 7; Topics Bulletin 
Staff 6; Variety Nite Staff 5. 6. 

In accordance with the "good neighbor" pol- 
icy Alex came to YUHSB in our sophomore 
year as ambassador from Brazil. One of the 
seniors who took the service squad seriously, 
he attempted singlehandedly to finance the 
Elchanite. He will study textile enginering at 
the Lowell Technological Institute. 

"The secret ingredient in this coffee is 
money!" 

Chuck full o' nuts 



GABRIEL SALZMAN 

Service Squad 2-4, 6; Variety Nite 3-6; Arista 
6, 8; Elchanite Typing 5. 6. 

Deported from Rambam. Gabe soon became 
the leader of the Minky opposition. A favorite 
victim of Slick Willie, he was often seen mak- 
ing postprandial explorations of Flatbush Av- 
enue. Electrical engineering at Poly will take 
up some of his time next year. 

"Stretched forth his hand." 

Genesis XII 






LARRY SCHECHTER 

Class Intramurals 1-8; Vice-President 6; De- 
bating 2-6; Service Squad 3-5; Coop 5-7. 

The "Great Chucher" of third year Hebrew, 
Larry was a chronic Kenmore Alley Cat. 
Equally skillful in math and slapball, he man- 
aged to earn a diploma as an extra-curricular 
activity. NYU will start treating him in bio- 
chemistry next year. 

"Aifo Shekter?" 

Chuck 



Meeting of the minds. 



Rear window. 













MARTIN SHAPIRO 

Class President 6; Vice-President 5; Sec'y- 
Treas. 4; English Library 4-6; Elchanite Pho- 
tography Editor 7, 8. 

Our swingin' represenative of Chaim Berlin. 
Marty spent his three years in YUHSB as 
Rabbi Kanotopsky's perennial student. "Rock- 
ing" through chem with the highest grade in 
the class, he ivill major in chemical engineer- 
ing at City. 

"Music maketh a cool cat." 

Big Frank Bacon 



MELVIN SINOWITZ 

Class Debating 5-8; Chagiga Leader 8; Elcha- 
nite Literary Staff 7, 8; Topics Sports Staff 
7, 8; Variety Nite 5-8. 

One of the most likeable and friendly guys 
in our class, Sinny served as President of the 
PBG for two years. Asking no recognition, Mel 
worked hard and was instrumental in making 
the chagigas and Variety Nite the successes 
that they were. We know his numerous assets 
will guarante his success. Brooklyn will gain 
a math major and a great guy next year. 

"The deed is everything, the glory naught." 
Goethe 



BERT SIROTE 

Service Squad 3-6; Topics Business Staff 5-8; 
President Math Club 5. 6. 

The only remaining victim of Kallner's pum- 
ice bath, Bert excelled as an ardent math stu- 
dent. He was also known as president of our 
local Zorro fan club. We re sure he will find 
success as a math major at Veshiva. 

"Out o£ the night, when the full moon is 
bright. . . ." 

the Cordettes 



37 






MYRON SOKAL 

Service Squad Lieutenant 7; Library Squad 
1-5; Kolenu Editor 5-8; Writer 4; Arista 5. 6; 
Office Squad 5; Topics News Staff 7. 

Myron devoted his four years to the library 
and Kolenu. holding top responsible positions 
in both. His main problem in school has been 
showing the teachers how to pronounce his 
name properly. He will be pre-med at Yeshiva 
and hopes to change his title to Dr. 
"S-u-k-e-e-l," Pediatrician. 

"I cannot tell what the dickens his name is." 
Shakespeare 



DAVID SPERLING 

Class Debating 1-8; Varsity Debating 4, 5; 
Head of YOC 7, 8; Topics Photography 5, 6; 
Service Squad 5; Bulletin Typing and Report- 
ing 5-8. 

Prolific composer and writer of senior 
"songs," Dave's activities were wholesomely 
diversified. Enthusiastic Hebraist, charter 
member of the "recess-lab-squad" and head 
of the YOC he has left a definite impression 
on the school. He will continue receiving a 
liberal and broad education at Brooklyn. 

"Life, liberty and the happiness of pursuit." 
Jefferson Thomas 



NAT STERNBERG 

Service Squad 7, 8; Class Debating Team 7; 
Class President 8. 

Through diligent study and hard work 
Noach managed to attain the highest class 
average in seventh term. Well liked by both 
teachers and students, he found a special place 
in Mr. Mayer's heart. He hopes to teach math 
or history after studying at Brooklyn. 

"Diligence is the mother of good fortune." 
Cervantes 




All in a day's worlc. 




GABRIEL SZEGO 

Gobby, our Betar representative from Israel, 
came to YUHSB in his sophomore year and 
for some strange reason seemed to forget all of 
his Hebrew. It was his fervent desire to recruit 
Betarim and stowaways to "Aretz." and to 
conduct the Moscow Philharmonic. His cry of 
"Kadachat M'chumeshet" will be heard in 
City College next fall. 

"Shtay gudot layardain — zu shelenu zu 
gom-kayn." 

Meyer Minkovich 






HERBERT TANOWITZ 

Varsity Debating 4-8; Class Debating Man- 
ager 1, 2, 3, 6, 7; Team 1-8; Business Manager 
5; Arista 6; Service Squad 4, 5. 

A rhetoric enthusiast, Herbie talked his way 
through many a class. His ability and interest 
in history were recognized even by Marty. As 
a history major at Brooklyn he will prepare 
for teaching or law. 

"A sophisticated rhetorician." 

Disraeli 



LARRY WACHSMAN 

Elchanite Typing Editor 7, 8; Office Squad 8; 
Library Squad 5-7; Service Squad 2; Topics 
Typing and Business 3-6. 

Bob's former right-hand man, Larry used 
experience gained typing various people's re- 
ports in the capacity of Elchanite typing 
editor. One of the Senor's "fine" boys, he 
represented Far Rockaway in the senior class. 
He hopes to teach math after studying it at 
Yeshiva U. 

"The diabolical invention, the typewriter." 
Sinclair Lewis 




Varsity Basketball 3-6; JV 1, 2; Class Veep 
7; Sec'y-Treas. 2, 3, 4; Athletic Manager 5; 
Variety Nite 1-8; Leader 5, 6; Arista 5-8; Top- 
ics Typing 1, 2. 

Morton J., a Varsity invalid, is one of the 
"all around" breed. Variety Nite, Varsity bas- 
ketball. G.O. and Arista reflect his many inter- 
ests. Our golden voiced, Morty enriched his 
musical background as glee club director in 
Senor's class. He will follow his father's ex- 
ample and pursue a cantorial career while at 
Columbia. 



"His master's voice.' 



RCA 



39 






JOSHUA WERBLOWSKY 

Class Debating 3, 6; Service Squad 1, 3, 6; 
Elchanite Typing Editor 7, 8; Topics News 
Staff 3, 4; Bulletin Staff 5, 6; JV 1-4; Varsity 
Basketball 5-8; Tennis Team 3-8, Captain 5-8; 
Track Team 5-8. 

J-O-S-H. our four letter man. was an all 
around athlete. Member of tennis, basketball 
and track teams, he was at the top of the class 
in popularity. Rabbi Kanotopsky's front-row 
learner. Josh showed himself to be a serious 
student in both departments. Yeshiva will in- 
herit him next year. 

"Tennis anyone?" 



BERNARD WITKIN 

Service Squad 3-6; Office Squad 5, 6; Head of 
Lost and Found 7. 8. 

Head of our Lost and Found. Bernie found a 
place in Rabbi Yogel's shiur in eighth term. 
His quiet, friendly manner and keen interest 
in Talmud will insure his success in the Rab- 
binate. He will study for the same and major 
in history at Y.U. 

"Seek and ye shall find." 



.^Mi^ttiBl^ 





ARTHUR WOLFISH 

Elchanite Co-editor 7, 8; Class Vice-President 
4; Debating Manager 5; Sec'y-Treas. 1; De- 
bating Team 1-8; Library Squad 3-4; Kolenu 
5. 6; Art Editor 7, 8; Subscription Manager 5-8. 

A talented artist and one of the best English 
and Social Studies students in the class, Artie 
dabbled in everything from art to literature, 
politics to debating. His fine scholarship and 
insight will help show his merit as an English 
and PoliSci major at Brooklyn. 

"Art is man's nature." 

P. J. Bailey 



Grin and bear it. 



40 




There s no plate like huine 






ALAN YACKOW 

Subscription Mgr. 7, 8; Elchanite Typing Staff 
7, 8; YOC 7. 8; Hebrew Library 7, 8; Office 
Squad 7, 8; Topics Business 7, 8. 

A man of many hobbies, Alan spent much 
time with his stamp collection, microscope and 
tropical fish. He engineered the subscription 
bureau to unprecedented success in the senior 
year. He'll subscribe to the AMA Journal as a 
pre-med at NYU. 

"Is there a doctor in the house?" 

Blue Shield 



HERBERT YOSKOWITZ 

Varsity Basketball 4-8; JV 1-3; Captain 3; 
Varsity Debating 4-6; Class Debating Man- 
ager 1, 3; Team 1, 3-7; Athletic Manager 8; 
Track Team 4; Service Squad 2, 4. 

Herb divided his time at YUHSB between 
athletics and rhetoric, serving on both Varsi- 
ties. A two-year silent companion of Rabbi 
Kanotopsky , he found it easy to get along well 
with everybody. This future lawyer will pur- 
sue his degree at City. 

"Good-nature is more agreeable in conver- 
sation than wit." 

Addison 



DAVID ZOMICK 

Arista 5-8; Leader 8; Variety Nite 1-8; Leader 
7, 8; Student Court Justice 7; Varsity Debating 
5-8; Elchanite Literary Editor 7, 8; Class De- 
bating 1-8. 

Sam spent much of his four years explain- 
ing the origin of his nickname and entertaining 
us with his musical renditions. Always alibiing 
his way out of good grades, our Variety Nite 
leader managed, however, to be a major source 
of "naches" for his rebbis. He will channel his 
interest and energy into math and physics at 
Brooklyn. 

Swing, Sam, swing. . . . 

Kerouac 



41 




liiiiiSTS and 



i^BliJES to 




ililBER through the 




FRESHMEN 

(neophyius calamatus) 

You mean it's not the big one next door but 
the little red schoolhouse on the corner?— 
Echhh . . . Why are there bars on the windows? 
Oh well, only 732 days left to graduation . . . 
Bashful bathing beauties parade before doctors 
in auditorium . . . Kallner explains tickets to 
Alumni Game are voluntary— everyone buys . . . 
Winter blizzard snows in Rabbi Frankel's desk 
. . . Does it move? Does it talk?— Ain payrush 
. . . Snowball fight between the Doochies and the 
Franks ends in wet stalemate . . . Rocky asks for 
help for Israel all day long and all day night . . . 
Sure, anybody can teach Elementary Algebra- 
office tries Cluck and Marty— well, almost any- 
body . . . But Rabbi Durchin, the telephone booth 
is not the office . . . Kallner inaugurates soap and 
pumice campaign by washing Shechter's and 
Sirote's backs . . . Whatever happened to those 
Chinese counterfeiters. Bob? . . . Ain payrush . . . 



You mean it's the little red schoolhouse next door': 



42 



Traveling salesman opens book stand for "Word 
Power Made Easy" . . . "Fritz" Kussin begins 
year-long anti-Volkswagen and kosher butchers 
harangue . . . Leon, the beatnik, sings "My 
Country 'tis of Thee" and receives for his recital 
pennies from heaven . . . Harry begins rewarding 
efforts-teaches us how to cut and paste paper 
dolls . . . Three guys get whacked by the Morsian 
golf club as he screams "play slambang will you— 
you nitwit!!" . . . J.V. beats Faculty as teachers 
succumb to Charley horses . . . Marathon run- 
Dooch chasing Resnick chasing Siller . . . Captain 
Gallant avoids English curriculum and discusses 
things of interest like "sons of witches" . . . Ain 
payrush . . . Moe Sohcahtoa tells us about Alge- 
bra, the story that asks the question— is there 
anyone who h-a-s-n-'-t the homewoik? . . . Res- 
nick wins a bet with Bob— gets 65 for his efforts 
. . . Fourth of July celebrated early in Doc's class 
. . . Ain payrush . . . Hebrew class faints dead 
away to the last man as Chuck attempts a feeble 
smile . . . Varsity beats Flatbush but loses to 
Uptown in the Garden— Moral : There are some 
finals you can't cheat on . . . Ain payrush . . . 
Kallner discusses sex and assures us we'll learn 
biology by braille . . . Boy, those "new" freshies 
sure are small . . . We take experimental algebra 
exam from Buffalo— experiment fails along with 
us . . . Mortality Rate: Gallant, Kallner, Melov, 
Kussin. 





Great Expectations! 





43 



SOPHOMORES 

(sfudenius seriousae) 



BT.A. expands— its name into Yeshiva Uni- 
♦ versity High School Of Brooklyn Boys 
Branch II . . . We meet our punniest teacher who 
shows us how everything has a great deal to do 
with French . . . Minkey flees Sinai Campaign, 
seeks asylum in Y.U.H.S.B.— special agent Szego 
follows close behind. His opening words "shmi 
Minkovitch," earn him a record 40 earlaps . . . 
Slick Willie keeps losing his temper and his 
trousers. He is instrumental in the formation of 
the P.B.G., Royal Order Of The Slick Eagle, 
whose motto is, "The road to hell is paved with 
people with good intentions'" . . . "But Hoff, why 





Which way to Linden Boulevard? 



are your pockets so wet." Water gun raid in Doc's 
class— Rabbi Zuroff invokes Sullivan Law . . . 
Eisenhower is re-elected as we go into three day 
mourning . . . Poor working conditions cause 
"set up" strike in Morse's class . . . 

Tanowitz: May I leave the room Mr. Brender? 

B render: Say where do you live anyway— in 

Flushing? Ha! Ha! 
Minkey has trouble getting into class one day, 
resorts to strong arm techniques— ""Vill you co- 
uperate?" . . . BOOM!-"Viseman get out!" . . . 
Hockey games held in Karlin's class— desks dis- 
appear . . . Lola Smith's exciting survey of French 
jurisprudence provides for stimulating French les- 
son . . . First period G.O. meeting ends fourth 




"M'boy, have you seen my briefcase? 



44 




period as we appropriate $450 for the skiing and 
pocket pool teams . . . Mine's a rain liat Mr. 
Brand, what's your excuse? . . . 

Levine: Sefior I'm going out of the room for a 

minute. 

Sefior: Come back here you — Get out of my 

sight! 
Brender leaves— new French teacher comes hur- 
tling in with new formula heart stimulant . . . 
Cocktail time in French room begins ... Ye Olde 
Topics appears revealing ancient origin of school 
. . . We experiment with serious drama in Brand's 
class as "Big Abe In Illinois" is presented . . . 
Allan fiddles while room burns . . . Bell Tele- 
phone Awards instituted at Thursday Night Mish- 
mars— Dr. Persky turns down invitation to lecture 
Minkey's anxious Hebrew class . . . P.B.G. expe- 
dition uncovers room 301 annex . . . Modern art 



gallery in Allan's room forced to close down . . . 
Doc sets new record— throws out four boys before 
second bell rings . . . "Bedikas Chometz" in 
Minkey's class turns up ticket to St. Paul and 
Blubsky "korbun from the penah" . . . Sehor goes 
into the banking business and settles accounts 
with everyone . . . Turetsky gives three hour 
Regents in half hour, spends twenty minutes tell- 
ing us we're wasting our own time . . . But Mr. 
Schiff do we have to sign our names in colored 
chalk? . . . Lag B'omer outing falls through as 
we all swim to school . . . Abe asks Shepsie "Is 
this a class?"— Question stumps everyone . . . 

Student: May I move up front? 

Wallach: No, I like the smell up here just fine. 
D. Lazar and J. Leibowitz hit political trail- 
Ouch! . . . We experience our first Regents as 
temperature exceeds our marks . . . Mortality 
Rate: Minkey, Wallach, Godin, Brender, Tu- 
retsky. 




"Stop tickling me." 



45 



JUNIORS 

(non-compus mentus) 



WHEEEEE! Back to school for another year 
of fun and frolic . . . New face in History 
department— "yes, we have no bananas" . . . IBM 
sends latest model-the CHUCK 203-to replace 
Minky— Ain payrush returns . . . Brand's progres- 
sive teaching puts Shakespeare and Aristotle in 
American Lit . . . Alumni lose again!!! ... If 
there's time at the end of the term Mr. Mayer, 
could you teach us some math? . . . Rumors about 
Marty are substantiated— he can't understand why 
we don't know how many six-foot Persians were 
killed at the Battle of Thermopylae . . . We get 
our first glimpse of Kenny as the smoke clears for 
a minute — what are "gedoilim?" . . . Scottish 
teacher teaches Spanish in French class . . . 

Schuss: Come with me to Rabbi Yogel! 

Marv: I'm not going! 

Schuss: All right, stay here. 
Recess lab squad experiments with cancer re- 
search—knock twice and ask for Bud . . . Frank 
Callan demonstrates right hook— Adelman ducks, 
gets hit anyway . . . Reluctant candidate Obie 
wins for Sec'y-Treasurer on "tshuva" ticket (613 
mitzvah stamps gets you a place in "olam 
habah")— turns it down on "bitel torah" grounds 
. . . Cluck spills sulfuric acid on himself and Ep- 
stein—tells Epstein there's nothing to worry about 
as he scurries into the washroom . . . 



CHUCK WAGON: Why do we have to buy 
Levi Soshuk's Regents Review? . . . Sifrus day— 
"Is he wearing pants?". . . 

Chuck: Sinowitz, where is the place? 

Sinowitz: If you don't know, I'm not going to 

tell you! 
Sniff, sniff, chemical warfare begins— Florient 
rains supreme . . . "Ha'im Hoff ode bayeshivaw?" 
. . . Underground railroad shovels books out of 
window— now you see 'em, now you don't . . . 




Two dollars on Lord Chuck. 



46 




-=2a 



Lm 





Rip roarin' "Welcome Home" party for Schecter 
—but "ain ochlim kon" . . . Fed up with entire 
class floating in late, Chuck retaliates— he keeps 
us in till 6:20— we demand more! . . . Mother 
Nature calls— Loey answers "bilee rishuss." U.S. 
Explorer I matches Sputnik as Milty Spin orbits 
into trig course— we learn how to figure the daily 
double with sines and cosines — it's "applied" 
mathematics . . . Stalag 17 breaks all records- 
folds before it's produced . . . BTA Nite School 
opens up as French and Spanish "Mishmars" be- 
gin— Senor has something to say about the Re- 
gents: "anything might PUP up" . . . Kenny de- 
cides that "musar" is more worthwhile than re- 
cess—we decide that protest march is more worth- 
while than shiur— Rabbi Zuroff agrees and re- 
wards us with a day off . . . Life begins at seventy 
for Seiior— takes whole period to blow out all the 
candles, another period to eat the cake . . . Two 
Regents in one day with an hour between— office 
tries to sneak in English final . . . Mortality Rate: 
Rabbi Karlin, Rabbi Gordon, Mayer, Callan and 
Spin. 



Food for thought. 




47 



SENIORS 

(senioritis supremus) 




WELCOME to the highest shiur!!! . . . New 
physics program instituted — on-the-job 
training ... "I don't icnow where he is Mr. Gold- 
stein, but his books are here" . . . Rabbi Dardac, 
could you pohzzibly tell us why your socks itch? 
. . . Whistle-blowing teacher insists that left- 
handed people are non-conformists . . . We take 
the State Scholarship exam— Lola answers science 
part without questions . . . Shmidy's class ad- 
journs to bowling alley— no one tells Shmidy . . . 
Helpless Harry admonishes: "Zomick, keep talk- 
ing so we won't know you're here— and we don't 
want you here anyway" . . . New version of 
"Camptown Races" reaches all-time high on BTA 
Hit Parade . . . Quiet please, Rabbi Heifitz is 
trying to learn . . . "Admits for sale"— see Sol . . . 




Varsity tears through MJHSL— Goldman comes 
through in the end . . . Septy holds seances as we 
take up optics— we're sure he's an optical illusion 
. . . Indoctrination trip to Y.U.— some impressed 
by school, others by exits . . . But Rabbi Kano- 
topsky. Con Edison is not drilling just to spite 
you . . . Sidney studies commas in Macbeth— 
SURPRISE!!! Shakespeare didn't know how to 
punctuate . . . Yok gives impartial survey of 
contemporary Israeli politics . . . Rabbi Fink 
finally tames the zoo . . . For Pete's sake, would 
you farmach the fenster, the temperature is 40 
degrees— Centigrade!! . . . Harry finishes writing 
test questions just in time to receive papers— so 
that's why they call it "advanced" algebra . . . 
Senior debaters proclaim: "VIVA BATISTA, 
keep Cuba in chains"— after all, you know how 
convertible Castros are . . . 




48 



Sidney: Shapiro, what were the dimensions of 

the Globe Theater? 

Shapiro: 36-24-36. 
Chanuka Chagiga features "To Tell the Truth"- 
everybody laughs . . . Gabe welcomes 1959 from 
under the table— swears he will refill bottle later— 
we bet he won't . . . "Unahitel" gets the boot 
—four Back-Row-Boys . . . new course EGOnom- 
ics (G-d Bless It) . . . Mr. Lippner is a most 
unusual teacher— in a class by HIMSELF. . . Doc 
assures Gobby, "Szego, you definitely know how 
to write in fine eevrees" . . . Sam Wong becomes 
the Stoolie Coolie . . . Polar Bear's eco class meets 
underground to escape oncoming warm weather 
. . . Buddy organizes calculus class, drops out 
after two days . . . We hit the jackpot, Becker 
hits the ceiling as we rack up 38 State Scholar- 
ships . . . "With an American Observer in each 
hand, he has supply but no demand" . . . sssssss 
sssssssssssssssss— Marty's ego deflates along with 
his tires . . . Septy boasts that he can practically 
teach math in his sleep— but we know he does 
. . . Jack, the Candy Man, looks for missing 
candy machine, finds Chuck, gets confused . . . 
Epidemic spreads through class causing many 
absences— Doctor Abe diagnoses: SENIORITIS, 
a malady which affects seniors particularly when 
they are entering their eighth and final term . . . 
Sweetheart gives marathon to his cockeyed won- 
ders— Ajax scores 800 . . . Why is there no Re- 
gents in economics? . . . Coop draws twolve 
shloppy shlopes . . . Brand dislocates chin re- 
citing "Tawmee this an' Tawmee that" . . . We 
celebrate Purim by ranking Marty to the ground 
as the Chagiga presents "Sergeant Lilko"— Saul's 
faculty marching song and "who letta air out o' 
Lilko's tiuz" cause sensation . . . Who's that tall 
man in the office who speaks like Donny? . . . 
Mortality Rate: Class of '59 and two tires. Four 
years— man, it seems like a day ... As our high 
school career closes we realize that much as we 
try we can"t forget our stay at BTA . . . SIC 
TRANSIT GLORIA MUNDI. 





49 



'xUomm 



National Merit Scholarship Corporation 

Finalists 

Ray Block Charles Cantor David Epstein Stanley Horwitz 

General Motors Scholarship Program 

Finalist 

Stanley Horwitz 

National Honors Society 
Scholarship Program 

Certificates of Merit 

David Jacobson Stanley Honvitz 

Finalists 
Charles Cantor Gabriel Salzman David Zomick 

Mayor's Committee Award 

To The Student Who Ranks Highest In His High School Studies 

Ray Bloch 

Merritt-Chapman and Scott 
Scholarship Program 

Winner 

Stanley Horwitz 

New York State Scholarships 



Herbert Adelman 

Ray Bloch 

Martin Braun 
"Charles Cantor 

Steven Fiegelstock 
"Alex Flamholz 
"Robert Gerstl 
"Donald Goldmacher 

Saul Helfenbein 
"Stanley Horwitz 



'David Jacobson 
Martin Kellman 
David Lazar 
Joseph Leibowitz 
Edward Lowenstein 
Michael Meshenberg 
Reuben Mezrich 
Marvin Pollack 

"Joseph Rapaport 

"David Resnick 



"Gabriel Salzman 
Larry Schechter 
Myron Sokal 
David Sperling 
Herbert Tanowitz 
Morton Waldman 
Joshua Werblowsky 
Arthur Wolfish 
David Zomick 



Alternates 
Martin Feldman Bernard Lichtenstein 



"Also State Science Scholarship 



50 





ACTivrrrES 



51 




SERVING as coordinator of the school's nu- 
merous extra-curricular activities is the G.O. 
Elected by the student body, it strives to create 
wide interest in its varied program. The school 
year 1958-59 saw the General Organization suc- 
cessfully carry out its plan of achieving greater 
student participation and interest. 

The event which yearly captures the attention 
of the entire student body is the election of the 
executive officers of the G.O. The fall term saw 
Donald Goldmacher elected President; David 
Lazar, Vice-President; and Harold Leibowitz, 




fall ierm 



Left to right, Seated: N. Ringel, M. Levine, C. Lopkin, lice I'leiiJent D. Lazar, President 
D. Goldmacher, Secretary-Treasurer H. Leibowitz, W. Reich, L. Chapman, M. Durst, M. 
Barenholz. Standing: A. Munzer. H. Meyerowitz, B. Vogel, M. Wolff. K, Prager, C. Nussbaum, 
A. Flamholz, P. H. Lowenstein. A. Wolfish. 




Secretary-Treasurer. In the spring term Joseph 
Rappaport was elected President. Elected along 
with Mr. Rappaport were Harold Leibowitz, 
Vice-President; and Bernard Lichtenstein, Secre- 
tary-Treasurer. 

For the G.O. to have a highly successful year 
it must have a smoothly operating commissions 
system. The commissions provide the means 
through which the G.O. carries out its many 
administrative responsibilities. Some of the more 
important commissions include the Public Rela- 
tions Commission which is responsible for ac- 
quainting the student body with important school 
events; the Service Credits Commission which 
determines the number of service points given for 



52 




Left to itt;hl Siuitiin Inasuni H 
Goldmacher, Vice President D. Lazar. 



Leibowitz, President D. 



participation in school activities; and the Con- 
stitutional Revisions Commission which reviews 
the G.O. constitution annually for loopholes and 
suggests amendments. 

Another aspect of G.O. activity is the highly 
informative assembly program. This year's sched- 
ule included a Freshman Orientation Assembly 
which presented a concise illustration of the 
various school activities; an overwhelmingly pop- 
ular Chanukah Chagiga and a warmly applauded 
Purim Chagiga both under the capable leadership 
of Joseph Leibowitz, Edward Lowenstein, and 
Mel Sinowitz; and an Arista Inductions and 
Awards assembly. The remaining assemblies con- 
sisted of interscholastic debates and forums on 
timely and interesting topics. 



Left to right. Seated: A. Schniire, M. Levine, C. Lopkin, M. Weiss, J. Cohen, 
S. Solomon, N. Sternberg, D. Goldkrantz, J. Flamholz, I. Fruchter, M. 
Barenholz, J. Wolf. Standing: M. Nathanson, D. Levine, G. Wolf, K. 
Prager, D. Sperling, W. Wolff, A. Reinhard, M. Meshenberg. 



spring term 




53 



Our annual show. Variety Nite, once 
proved that our small student body has many 
diversified talents. With David Zomick handling 
the staging chores and Joseph Leibowim the 
advertising campaign, the show was fa^tably 
received by a large audience. 

Our faculty advisor, Mr. Joseph Strum, fpough 
ill part of the school year, faithfully served i: 
the interests of the student body. 





Left to right: Secretary-Treasurer B. Lichten- 
stein, President J. Rapaport, Vice President 
H. Leibowitz. 



54 






spring term 




Left to right. Seated: J. Werblowsky, Chief Justice A. 
Reinhard, D. Epstein. Standing: D. Levine, G. Wolf, K. 
Prager. 




fall ferm 



ADMINISTRATING student justice in Y. U. 
H.S.B. is the Student Court. Composed of 
five regular justices and an alternate, the Court 
is elected by the class representatives in the 
Student Council. 

Each infringement of school rules reported by 
the Service Squad is heard before the Student 
Court. Under the supervision of Faculty Advisor 
Mr. Joseph B. Strum, the Chief Justice, elected 
by his colleagues, questions each defendant 
accused by the Captain of the Service Squad who 
acts as prosecutor. 

When each Justice has satisfied his legal curi- 
osity, a verdict is handed down. If guilty, the 
student must write penal dissertations or serve 
detention periods. This is another example of 
student democracy as it flourishes in Yeshiva. 




Left to right: D. Epstein, B. Hulkower, K. Prager, Chief 
Justice M. Wolff, M. Hochstein. 



55 





SERVICE 







Left to right. Front row: M. Schlusselberg. J. Kovin, M. Benzon, M. Levine, J. Jedwab, A. 
Schnure. Second row: W. Kerness, B. Kopf, Captain A. Rosner, Lieutenant M. Sokal, 
Captain D. Goldkrantz, M. Weiss, S. Deutsch, S. Weilgus. Third row: M. Durst, I. Fruchter, 
C. Lopkin, P. Haimm, H. Marcus, P. Putter, H. Meyerowitz. M. Gold, S. Gottlieb. G. Halpern, 
J. Weinstein. Fourth row: A. Weinberg, S. Solomon, R. Levine, C. Nussbaum, B. Lichtenstein, 
G. Abramoff, A. Reinhard, D. Tantleflf. 



iaW term 



56 



SQUAD 




spring term 



Left to right, Front row: J. Kovin, M. Levine, G. Listokin, Captain M. Sokal, Captain A. 
Rosner, B. Hulkower, J. Cohen, M. Selig. Second row: W. Werblowsky, S. Feder, M. Weiss, 
I. Fruchter, C. Lopkin S. Silver, S. Lipstein, M. Durst, G. Wolf, A. Schnure, J. Weinberg. 
Third row: P. Haimm, M. Nadel, A. Weinberg. M. Diskind. C. Nussbaum. S. Solomon. R. 
Levine, M. Schiff. 



A 



THE duties of the Service Squad, police arm of 
the CO., are to insure proper decorum and 
help keep the school clean. It executes these 
duties in conjunction with the Student Court. 
Students charged by its members of having vio- 
lated school regulations are tried by the Court 
and dealt with accordingly. 

A select group, the Squad represents fairly 
each of the classes. Its importance in the main- 
tenance of efficient student government can not 
be minimized. 

This year's officers have done an admirable 
job in realizing the full potential of the Squad. 
The fall term saw Alex Rosner and David Gold- 
krantz as Captains, Avrum Marcus and Myron 



Sokal as Lieutenants. In the spring term the 
Squad was headed by Vice-President Harold 
Leibowitz. Responsible to him were Myron Sokal, 
Captain; Charles Nussbaum and Andy Reinhard, 
Lieutenants. 




57 




IN RECENT years, an activity that has grown 
both in popularity and stature among the stu- 
dent body is the semi-annual "Chagiga" fun fest. 
These Chagiga celebrations are held in conjunc- 
tion with the joyous Jewish festivals of Chanuka 
and Purim. The gleeful spirit of the holidays com- 
bined with the tactful entertainment and satirical 
sketches of school life provide pleasant entertain- 
ment for both student and faculty. 

The past year has witnessed two of the most 
successful Chagigas ever to be presented in our 
school. The Chanukah celebration held in 
December was executed under the able leadership 




M. Meshenberg, H. Leibowitz, E. Lowenstein, and 
J. Leibowitz decorate auditorium for Chanuka 
Chagiga. 




58 





Left to right: M. Durst, K. Morris, J. Kestenbaum, B. Hulkower, 
D. Zomick. 



of Joey Leibowitz and Ed Lowenstein. The audi- 
ence was treated to a delightful evening of songs 
and laughter, all highlighted by the now famous 
lampooning skit— "To Tell the Truth." 

Spurred on by the winter triumph, the Purim 
staff, consisting of Joey Leibowitz, Mel Sinowitz, 
and David Zomick, proceeded to equal the pre- 
ceding term's successful endeavor. The evening's 
merriment reached its pinnacle with a rendition 
from the chorus (favorably depicting the school 
faculty), and a two act play dealing with the 
physical relationship between air and tires, en- 
titled, "Sgt. Lilko." 

Much credit is due to the student body for 
enhancing this aspect of school life. 



H. Leibowitz, J. Leibowitz, H. Adelman, and A. 
Wolfish construct Chanuka menorah. 




59 




Left to right: H. Adelman, D. Epstein, K. Prager. 
M. Sinowitz, R. Bloch, S. Helfenbein. 



EQUALLING and surpassing Variety Nite 
tradition, this year's seventh annual show 
was an unparalleled success. Held as usual in the 
Walt Whitman Auditorium, it moved smoothly 
and rapidly with a near flawless performance. 
Under the competent direction of its leaders, 
Joseph Leibowitz and David Zomick, a group of 
fine varied acts was performed. 

Highlight of the show was a one act play, "The 
Ace of Spades," adapted from a story by Robert 
Louis Stevenson. Prepared entirely by its per- 



i 



formers, it proved a worthwhile efi'ort despite 
technical difficulties inherent in the stage. 

M.C.d by alumnus Howie Berg, the show, also 
contained a medley of folk songs by our talented 
chorus as well as a rendition of popular songs by 
our Rock 'n Roll quartet. All musical selections 
were accompanied by the school band under the 
capable baton of David "Sam" Zomick. A new 



Left to ritiht: I. Gober, M. Durst, K. Morris, B. Hulkower, J. Leibowitz. 



60 




f^ # <3 



frr^ 




Left to right: D. Jacobson, J. Rapaport, H. Leibman, M. Waldman. 





and surprising innovation was the performance 
of a humorous monologue entitled "Dinner's On 
The Table," expertly executed by David A. 
Epstein. 

The proceeds from the sale of Variety Nite 
tickets went to the G.O. and constituted a major 
source of income for the year. 




Left to right. Front row: S. Deutsch, M. Shapiro, M. Rosenbaum, J. Rapa- 
port. Second row: D. Sperling, R. Levine, L. Waller, G. Salzman, M. 
Waldman, D. Jacobson. 




61 



y.o.a 



%y 




Left to riiiht. Seated: L. Lundner, Faculty Advisor Rabbi P. Yogel, D. 
Sperling. Standing: C. Schertz, J. Rapaport. M. Hochstein, M. Pollack, L. 
Mufson, A. Yackow, H. Peine. 



THE Yeshiva Organization Commission is now 
in its tiiird year of existence. The purpose of 
the Y.O.C. is to coordinate all of Y.U.H.S.B.'s 
religious activities which include the Mishmar, 
Minyan, and Kashruth Commission. The Mish- 
mar is held Thursday nights under the leadership 
of chairmen David Sperling and Leroy Lundner, 
with the cooperation of the Talmud Department. 

Led by Louis Mufson and Gary Pollack, the 
Minyan, which meets daily before classes in the 
auditorium to fulfill the precept of congregational 
prayer, this year set new highs for daily attend- 
ance totals. 

Due to the capable supervision of Rabbi Yogel, 
the various committees were able to cary on their 
activities and further group religious observance 
in Y.U.H.S.B. 















,"><v 



iXS-J^yt.'^t 



62 




Left to right: A. Wolfish, A. Greenberg, Faculty Advisor Rabbi J. Epstein, 
M. Sokal, K. Prager. 



KOLENU, our school's only annual Hebrew 
publication, is now in its eleventh year of 
publication. It has become known in Jewish 
circles the world over, and each year copies are 
sent to rabbis and religious leaders in all parts of 
the U.S. and Israel. 

This year, Kolenu had no specific theme. The 
students were asked to write on topics they felt 
were closest to them. The articles therefore, 
ranged from personal experiences to religious 
philosophy and ethics. As usual, there is a section 
devoted to "Chidushei Torah" articles, another 
to literary articles, and the remainder to feature 
articles about school activities and to several 
interviews written by the editors. 



Koknu 




63 




Left to right: Editor-in-Chief M. Wolf, Faculty Advisor 
Mr. S. Gold, Managing Editor Alex Flamholz. 



TOPICS 



ONE of the most important activities in any 
school is its pubhcations. The official Gen- 
eral Organization monthly newspaper is the 
Topics, originally published by the Journalism 
Club. 

Winner of the Columbia Scholastic Press As- 
sociation's Medalist rating for the past two years, 
the Topics remains the primary organ of student 
expression. The Topics, edited by Mitchell Wolff 
under the supervision of Faculty Advisor Mr. 
Sidney Gold, is circulated throughout the Yeshiva 
University High Schools. 

Popular features of the Topics are "The Wolf's 
Den" by Michael and Mitchell Wolff, "Meet The 
Faculty" by Kenneth Prager, and "Sports Slants" 
by Martin Kellman. 





Left to right, Seated: R. Bloch, Managing Editor A. Flamholz, Editor-in- 
Chief M. Wolf, K. Prager, D. Epstein. Standing: D. Levine, M. Wolff, M. 
Kellman, M. Agulnek, J. Flamholz. 



64 




FORMED over four years ago as a supplement 
to the Topics' coverage, the mimeographed 
Bulletin is the only New York Yeshiva weekly 
newspaper. 

In its standard two page format, the Bulletin 
devotes its first page to news and its second page 
to the editorial opinion and to comments from 
the student body. 

Headed this year by Editor-in-Chief David A. 
Epstein, the Bulletin covers all facets of school 
activities. Its editorial columns have contained 
both praise and constructive criticism of every 
event in Y.U.H.S.B. Its Monday afternoon 
appearances are eagerly awaited in all student 
circles. 





Left to right. Seated: G. Wolf, Editor-in-Chief D. Epstein, H. Fischer. 
Standing: M. Agulnek, L. Feiner, D. Weinstein, M. Levine. 



65 




ARISTA, Y.U.H.S.B.'s honor society, became 
' this past year, a chapter of the National 
Honor Society. This new status gives our out- 
standing students membership in a nationwide 



ARISTA 




Left to right. Front row: Faculty Advisor Mr. S. Leibo- 
witz, J. Werblowsky, M. Wangrofsky, S. Feigelstock, M. 
Barenholz. Second row: M. Rosenbaum. D. Epstein. R. 
Bloch, A. Greenberg, M. Braun. D. Jacobson. B. Vogel. 
D. Kaplan, L. Feiner. 



organization composed of both private and pub- 
he high schools. Scholastic achievement and 
outstanding extra-curricular participation are the 
rigid entrance requirements of the organization. 

After filling oat an application in which he 
states his reasons for desiring to join Arista, the 
prospective applicant must be approved by the 
Assembly (the Arista members themselves) and 
the Senate (consisting of faculty members). If 
he is approved, the new member is inducted at 
the awards assembly where he takes the Arista 
oath and is given his Arista pin and certificate. 

Aside from rewarding its members with pres- 
tige and recognition. Arista conducts a program 
of coaching students in those subjects in which 
they are deficient. 

Ably advised by Mr. Samuel Lebowitz, Arista 
engaged in many worthwhile activities in 
Y.U.H.S.B. Officers during the Fall term were 



spring term 



66 







JiW^KL. ' 




r'^'^lfMlk 


1 


^^L . f " 





fall term 



Left to right, Front row: Faculty Advisor S. Leibowitz, Leader R. Bloch, 
D. Epstein, M. Pollack, M. Sokal. Second row: D. Jacobson, D. Lazar, 
K. Klein, M. Wolf. Third row: J. Rapaport, L. Lunder, G. Salzman, D. 
Sperling, K. Prager. Fourth row: M. Waldman, M. Wolflf, C. Cantor. 



Ray Bloch, President; David Jacobson, Vice 
President; and Stanley Horwitz, Secretary. These 
same positions were held during the Spring 
semester by David Zomick, Stanley Horwitz, and 
David Epstein respectively. 




i 



67 



IN pursuance of its policy of expansion, the 
English Library has this year added to its 
already substantial selection of volumes. New 
books in every category have provided the stu- 
dents with the most up-to-date information. 



ENGLISH llBR^Ry 




Left to right. Seated: P. Schneider. J. Berkowitz. Faculty Advisor Mr. R. 
Bassell, M. Shapiro. D. Rhine. Standing: C. Horowitz. A. Freedman. M. 
Mermelstein, A. Greenberg, S. Deutsch, J. Bunim. 



Among the additions are current best sellers, an 
historical atlas, modern biographies, hobby hand- 
books and topical works. More magazine selec- 
tions have been introduced and caught the 
attention of the student body. 

Chief Librarians were Martin Shapiro, fall 
term, and Paul Schneider, spring term. Assisting 
them were Lieutenants Joel Berkowitz, fall term, 
and David Rhein, spring term. 

Innovated this spring were a special Library 
division of the Service Squad headed by Martin 
Rosen and Larry Chapman. Mr. Robert Bassell, 
Faculty Advisor, supervised the library activities. 




SERVING as the source for all talmudic and 
Hebraic research, the Hebrew library has 
since its inception proved to be one of the most 
valuable of our school's assets. Its 2500 volumes 
of commentaries on the bible and talmud are in 
constant use by the students and instructors dur- 
ing the morning sessions. 

Under the direction of Rabbi Epstein, the 
library has recently received many new editions 
including novels in Hebrew translation as well as 
hebrew books dealing with all phases of Jewish 
religious and ethical teachings. 



HEBREW liBRaay 



An important feature of the Hebrew Library 
is the book agency, headed by Jeffrey Frost. It 
makes available to the students all types of re- 
ligious articles at greatly reduced prices. Profits 
from these sales go towards the acquisition of 
new books. 





Left to right: Head Librarian J. Frost, 
Faculty Advisor Rabbi J. Epstein. 



Left to right: Head Librarian J. Frost, 
R. Leibes, Z. Weinstein. 



69 




Left to right. Standing: R. Bloch, Dchutini; Manager B. Hulkower, D. 
Epstein. M. Kellman, T. Dershowitz, D. Zomick, M. Wolf. K. Klein. 
Seated: H. Tanowitz, M. Hochberg, M. Wolff. 




INTRAMURAL and interscholastic debating 
affords our students an opportunity to develop 
poise and style in public speaking. 

In intramural debates, each class is represented 
in either of two leagues, freshmen and sopho- 
mores in the Junior League and juniors and 
seniors in the Senior League. A schedule is drawn 
up which permits each team to engage in two 
debates with every other team in their league. A 
championship debate is held at the end of each 
season before the entire student body. 

Led by Benjamin Hulkower, fall term Debat- 
ing Manager, and Murray Hochberg, spring 
term's coordinator, our Varsity Debating Team 
compiled an impressive record of five victories 
and one defeat. Included among the losers are 



70 





Flatbush, HILI, and Central. For the first time 
in four years we met defeat at the hands of 
Columbia Grammar. 

The much-enjoyed Public Speaking Club was 
unfortunately dropped from the curriculum. 
Nevertheless, interest in debating is maintained 
via school debates held at assemblies, and inter- 
school forums which feature current problems as 
the topic of discussion. 




Left to right: Mitchell Wolf, M. Kellman, B. Hulkower, R. Bloch, D. Epstein, Debating Manager 
M. Hochberg, D. Zomick, K. Klein, Michael Wolff, R. Levine, T. Dershowitz. 





"^ 



71 



iiiiwiii 




Y' U.H.S.B.'s varsity ended the most successful 
♦ season in its history on March 28, losing a 
very close contest to RJJ for the Metropolitan 
Jewish High School Championship. Since Madi- 
son Square Garden, the customary site for the 
final game, was not available, the contest was 
held in the Brooklyn College gym. Spurred on by 
the most sipirited student support in recent years, 
the hoopsters lost only two other games to YUHS 
our traditional rivals and ended the season with 
a very impressive 12-3 record. 




Left to right. Front row: N. Bersson, J. Goldman, Co-captain L. Haspel, Captain H. Fruchter, 
K. Prager, J. Werblowsky. Second row: Manager A. Goldstein, Timer M. Pollack, I. Feigen- 
blum, D. Levine, R. Mezrich, G. Wolflf, B. Lichtenstein, Scorer J, Botknecht, Scorer M. Kellman. 
Third row: P. Bersson, J. Strauch, M. Nathanson, H. Yoskowitz, T. Dershowitz, L. Garber. 




72 



Under the guidance of a new coach, Irv For- 
man, the "Yugars," as the team is nicknamed, 
defeated every team in the league with the excep- 
tion of YUHS twice during the season. This fine 
showing was due mainly to the amazing speed 
and rebounding strength of our players. The apex 
of the season was reached when the varsity de- 
feated Ramaz in a hard fought contest and gained 
the right to play RJJ for the championship. 

In non-league play Y.U.H.S.B., for the first 
time defeated Brooklyn Friends twice; defeated 
the Alumni; and for the first time scrimmaged 
against a PSAL team, Midwood. 

The season's leading scorers were Howie 
Fruchter and Mickey Nahtenson averaging 14.9 
and 12 points per game respectively. Three of 
our players, Howie Fruchter, Jerry Goldman and 
Larry Haspel were named to the All Star Team. 
Howie Fruchter, the league's top back-court man, 
was also given an all-city honorable mention by 
the New York Post. 



Season's Record 




64 Alumni* 


51 


54 Ramaz 


49 


53 R.J.J. 


49 


52 Y.U.H.S. 


58 


73 H.I.L.I. 


29 


74 Brooklyn Friends* 


57 


57 R.J.J. 


47 


67 Flatush 


47 


63 Brooklyn Friends* 


59 


35 Y.U.H.S. 


56 


65 Flatbush 


50 


58 H.I.L.I. 


33 


61 Ramaz 


45 


45 Ramaz** 


35 


44 R.J.J.*** 


49 


865 


714 


* Non League games 




** Semi-finals 




*** Finals 




Leading Scorers 




Fruchter 


215 


Nathenson 


176 


Goldman 


170 


Haspel 


156 


Garber 


76 


Dershowitz 


29 



Lejt to right: Co-captain L. Haspel, Athletic Manager 
R. Mezrich, Captain H. Fruchter. 





73 




J.¥ 



AN integral part of varsity athletics, the Junior 
^ Varsity basketball team is the training 
ground for future varsity players. Through the 
J. v., budding basketball talent is discovered, 
trained, and given a chance to practice and 
develop. Very few boys play for the Varsity 
without spending some time on the J. V. 

This year, coached by fall term Athletic Man- 
ager Steven Solomon, the J.V. compiled a 7-6 
record against local clubs and organizations and 
in a newly formed J.V. league under the auspices 
of the Inter Yeshiva High School Student Coun- 
cil. Outstanding players for the J.V. this year 
were Barry Steiglitz, Norman Ringel and Vel 
Worblowsky. 




Left to right, Front row: W. Seeve, B. Wolff, G. Blier, 
B. Steiglitz. Second row: Athletic Manager and Coach 
S. Solomon, P. Haimm, A. Weinberg, N. Pianko, N. 
Ringel. Third row: W. Werblowsky, M. Levine, M. 
Cohen, J. Kovin. 




74 




I NTRAMURALS, a traditional part of Y.U.H. 
' S.B.'s athletic program, provides recreation 
for our lunch hour while inspiring a strong spirit 
of competition and sportmanship throughout the 
school. In these ways it proves a valuable aid to 
our physical education program. During lunch 
hour and free time different classes send repre- 
sentative teams to compete for the school cham- 
pionship in such varied sports as basketball, 
slapball, foulshooting, football, ping-pong, and 
Softball. All intramurals except baseball are held 
on school grounds. The entire program is coordi- 
nated and conducted by the school athletic man- 
ager with the help of the athletic managers of 
the participating classes. 




75 




OLDEST among our minor teams, the chess 
team gives able boardmen a chance to 
compete against talented students in other yeshi- 
vas. In a league under the auspices of the Inter 
Yeshiva Student council our chessmen, captained 
by Martin Feldman, compiled an adequate 
record. 

Members are chosen through a series of com- 
petitive matches held at the beginning of each 
term. With the experience garnered this year, the 
chessmen hope for a brighter future. 



Left to right: H. Fruchter, M. Feldman, J. 
Mehler, M. Hochberg, M. Braun, J. Leibowitz, 
M. Diskind. D. Jacobson, J. Rapaport. 



'^uiMuuj 



Left to right: Co-captains J. Rapaport and J. 

Werblowsky. 



76 




FOUR YEARS after its inception, the tennis 
team this year has scheduled matches against 
Brooklyn Friends and Flatbush Yeshiva. The 
team under the guidance of Seymour Hoffman, 
practices weekly in Lincoln Terrace Park. A 
great prevalence of lower termers on the squad 
guarantees a bright future for the netmen. It is 
the hope of the tennis team that other schools 
will form teams in order that an inter yeshiva 
league may be formed. 






Left to right, Seated: Captain I. Feigenblum, J. Goldman, L. Haspel, M. 
Nathanson. Standing: H. Leibman, J. Berkowitz. P. Bersson, L. Schecter. 



Left to right: Co-captains H. Leibowitz and G. Szego. 





CAPTAINED by Hesh Leibowitz and Gobby 
Szego, Y.U.H.S.B.'s track team, placed third 
in its only meet of the year held at East River 
Park under the aegis of the Inter Yeshiva Student 
Council. 

Unfortunately, yeshiva students have very little 
free time, and a prerequisite for a successful track 
team is constant practice. It is hoped that our 
able lower term track men will find more time 
to practice in future years and that track will one 
day find its place among our top sports. 



77 




Lejt to right. Front row: H. Gralla, N. Ringel, C. Adler, 
F. Rosen. Second row: G. Wolff. J. Frost, W. Wolff. 
Third row: J. Ressler, P. Haimm, M. Zangen, A. Alex- 
ander. 



YU.H.S.B.'s swimming team, this year enjoyed 
♦ its most successful season in the school's 
history, placing second, by a narrow nine point 
margin (139-130), behind a bigger and more 
experienced RJJ team, in the Inter Yeshiva High 
School League. 

Starting the season without a coach, a pool, 
or any experienced swimmer. Captain Charlie 
Nussbaum and Co-Captain Mike Wolf, after 
much agitation were granted a pool and a coach. 
Coach Norman "Lee" Leibrock of The Flatbush 
Boy's Club welded a group of inexperienced 
freshmen, sophomores and juniors into a tough 
winning machine. 

Leading off with a loss to RJJ, our shaky but 
improving team reversed direction, defeating 
H.LL.I. and Flatbush twice, losing again to RJJ, 
and trouncing YUHS three times. 

The team is looking forward to compiling the 
best swimming record in I.Y. history next year 
with the return of this year's entire team. 




Left to right: Captain C. Nussbaum, Coach N. Leibrock, 
Co-captain M. Wolff. 



78 



OTTh 




nOR the first time in the history of Y.U.H.S.B., 
' a science magazine has taken a place among 
the school's chief publications. The Atom is 
headed by Editor-in-Chief, Harvey Fisher with 
Mr. Samuel Leibowitz as faculty advisor. The 
magazine's purpose, which is to discuss topics of 
current interest in science, has been fulfilled, 
largely due to the efforts of the science and math 
writers. Among the subjects written about were 
the conservation of parity, the synthesis of nylon, 
and the present controversy over the shape of the 
universe. 

The technical aspects of publishing the journal 
are administered by Steven Solomon, Typing 
Editor, and Simeon Hook, who leads the art staff. 
It is the hope of the Atom's editors that the 
magazine will continue to grow and improve 
during the future years. 



'S. Hook, Editor-'m-Chiej H. Fischer. Faculty Advisor 
f.Klein. S. Solomon. Standing: S. Gurewitch, M. Weiss. 






Left to right: M. Pianko, M. Levine, K. Klein, S. Gurewitch, C. Adler. 



Left to right: C. Adler, K. Klein. Managers. 



80 



ALTHOUGH getting off to a late start, Y.U. 
H.S.B.'s co-op store had a successful and 
profitable year. Under the leadership of Kenny 
Klein and Charles Adler, the co-op functioned at 
a profit and helped wipe out initial debts. En- 
abhng students to purchase supplies and school 
wearing apparel, the co-op seeks to benefit 
students and aid the G.O. Student participation 
is also at its peak and now, six years after its 
inception, the co-op, firmly established finan- 
cially, is a permanent, successful and integral 
segment of the student program. 




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iim 




LITERATURE 



81 





by DAVID ZOMICK 



"THESE are the days when minds of men every- 
' where are turning to thoughts of lasting peace. 
In this era armaments have unremittingly been 
increased beyond anything previously known and, 
if it does not stop soon, the outcome of this 
avowedly defensive armament must eventually be 
war, on an unprecedented scale of rage and bru- 
tality. War between states can be abolished; it 
does not belong indefensibly in the order of na- 
ture. Never in history were any people blessed 
with as many capable and heroic minds, able to 
stand up against the combined power of the rest 
of the world and clearly to indicate a better civ- 
ilization. The life of mankind depends upon find- 
ing a better way to security than a race of armies 
and atomic bombs. The world is growing weary 
of bitterness and hate. The incalculable sacrifices 
that have been made by every nation and nation- 
ality, both in youthful lives and in wealth, the 
economic losses that have been greater than peo- 
ple ever believed they could endure, the dissolu- 
tion of normal daily life; quicken in the minds 
and hearts of men everywhere the desire that 
peace shall be real, shall be true, and shall be 
lasting. 



82 



EOXJC-A-TIOrsT 



But, if we want to create even only the begin- 
ning of orderly relations between nations, we 
must try to arrive at a more scientific, more ob- 
jective method of observation, which can be 
brought about only through education. If we 
truly want lasting peace we must learn to rise 
above our dogmatic, nation-centric conceptions. 
It is the job of each nation to see to it that its 
peoples are educated and are known intimately 
by all other peoples. One really quarrels with 
one's friends and intimates and it would seem to 
follow that if we were taught about and knew the 
other folks in the world quite well, and if they 
knew us equally as well, the principal block in 
the edifice of peace shall have been created. We 
should not build up stores of missiles and anti- 
missiles but rather we must arm ourselves with 
the armor of truth and compassion and unity and 
understanding, all of which can be brought about 
only through a very carefully planned system of 
education. 

To understand, we must study. We must study 
not merely what we desire to believe. That will 
always be skilfully and artistically presented for 
us. We must try to examine our world not with 
a feeling of superiority, or with a feeling of con- 
tempt for others, but rather with the impartiality 
of a trained physician, for without a correct diag- 
nosis of the disease there is no hope for a cure. 



This diagnosis will be difficult work and will in- 
volve learning and teaching much that is bitter 
and distasteful to accept. The lessons of peace 
and equality are not easy for nations accustomed 
to supremacy and domination. It is primarily the 
victors who must be educated. It is folly to plan 
for a free, peaceful world, and at the same time 
plan that we should be the masters of it. History 
should teach us that whenever the vehicle has 
been nationalism, the terminus has been war and 
totalitarianism. But if we do learn to live and act 
like reasonable men, there need be no obstacle 
to the peaceful coexistence of different kinds of 
governments and systems. 

Let us learn to live in peace and justice with 
all countries and all peoples in this world. To do 
this we must educate and re-educate. All men, 
all nations must be educated. But first, we must 
educate ourselves. 




83 




BATTLEGROUND 



hv MARTIN KELLMAN 



THE World, tensely waiting, watched the be- 
ginning of the titanic struggle. The world 
situation made the meeting of these two great 
armies inevitable— now it had come. Tenaciously, 
the two sides fought for every piece of ground, 
every inch of territory. First, one would advance 
only to be driven back by the sheer might of the 
other and with each inch the masses became more 
and more excited. It was a bloody battle. Men 
being carried off the field, maimed, on stretchers 
and men's faces groveling in the dirt were fre- 
quent sights. No one was impartial in this dy- 
namic struggle. The outcome was of world-wide 



concern. The area was swarming with newspaper- 
men frantically scratching notes and pounding 
their typewriters reporting the crucial happenings 
to an anxious public. Brawn was not of sole im- 
portance. Intelligence too played a role in this, 
the acme of struggles. Intricate codes and signals 
were devised for communication between the two 
field generals and their men; meanwhile the stale- 
mate of strength continued. Periodically, there 
was a lull in the battle but it again flared up in all 
its monstrous proportions. Many turned away in 
horror and disgust from watching man pitted 
against man. But every inch was essential. Neither 
was giving ground. But what was happening now? 
One side was making a tremendous drive, push- 
ing the enemy back, farther back, still farther 
back. Like a steamroller, they could not be 
stopped. The world heard and was stunned. They 
were nearing their goal, their final aim. And 
now, finally it was over. In some places the peo- 
ple shouted with glee but for others it was the 
end of the world. A quiet blanket of peace settled 
over the previously strife-torn battlefield. The 
titanic struggle had ended, not in surrender, but 
far, far worse for the losers in the winning touch- 
down. Notre Dame had beaten Penn State 7-0. 



84 



One Year Later 



by MELVIN SINOWITZ 



When I was a tender fifteen plus one, 

My amorous life had long begun 

Thought I. 

To charm each miss 

Into a kiss 

Wrought I. 

But success 

Had proved to be elusive 
To tristesse 

My affairs were conducive. 
Then came the majestic moment when. 
Like a raucous rooster, I had my hen. 
Sublimity suffused my skeleton, 

Unmitigatedly 
While her aplomb, for no apparent reason. 
Irritated me. 

Never had I witnessed a scene. 
Upon a giant movie screen, 
In which emotions were given vent, 
Having the orchestra reticent. 

The bandsmen were ever tireless 

When Gable, Clark, 

Sent a spark 

Along his labial wireless. 

But the blatant bells wouldn't tintinnabulate. 
Nor the machines of emotion try to tabulate. 
The vociferous brass wasn't fluent. 
The noisy orchestra had played truant. 
Nor was I into a coma sent. 

Of course, at seventeen, all was different. 











/ 








1 




1 




\ ^ j 












85 




by CHARLES CANTOR 



TWO A.M. — one bright rectangle of light 
blazed out of the huge office building reaching 
up to the heights of the New York skyline. The 
light displayed a vague silhouette of two figures 
working at a drawing desk, motionless except for 
occasional sweeps of their arms to drain a gulp 
of coffee. 

David Sonner, A.B., A.M. - Harvard; Ph.D. 
- M.I.T., and Herbert Pierce, A.B. - Cornell; 
A.M., Ph.D. — Princeton, began their work to- 
gether as instructors in the same private college. 
Both were teaching in order to continue research 
in their fields — socio-dynamics. When they found 
their interests similar, collaboration began. But 
why did Dave have to get married just before the 
spring semester? By the end of the term he and 
Herb ran into financial difficulties and had to 



search for something more lucrative. A position 
in New York caught their eye — research and 
development work, good salary, special training 
and creative personality requisite — sounded fine. 
They were in that office twenty-four stories up 
within three days. And they came at the right 
time — height of the year. 

"Two week deadline, boys," they were told. 
This, their first job, demanded all the concentra- 
tion they could muster. Initial planning and lay- 
out of the problem dribbled away a week. Many 
angles and approaches hit a dead-end— days were 
passing as heartbeats. Then, the last night of the 
fortnight was steadily disappearing and here they 
were — 2 o'clock — motionless, yes, but feverish 
with thought. 

How agonizing it was to sense the solution 
floating somewhere in the reservoirs of the mind 
yet out of reach. 

One of them penciled with bold almost vicious 
strokes — no, no, it's wrong — a quick rub of the 
eraser and the words vanish with the thought. 

How can you sift through all you've absorbed 
in years of study? 

Here was where their training had to pay off — 
the ingenuity of the scientist had to appear. 

A harsh slurp signaled the last of the coffee. 
Dave rested his chin on the edge of the cup. His 
eyes glared ahead, flicked to the side, up, to the 
other side. 

His "Oh" came out softly and slowly. "I have 
it" barely escaped from his lips. He wrote — Herb 
looked. They loosed a sigh of triumph in unison 
and laughed — "Our cake is the mostest — buy 
Hostess." 



by STANLEY HORWITZ 



THE church steeple pealed sharply through the 
clear New England air— one, two— silence- 
one, two. As the bell sounded the traditional 
death notice, the countryfolk knew that the ex- 
pected had finally occurred. Old Eben had died. 

It cannot be said that Eben's death would cause 
great mourning in this small town for Eben Strong 
had not been a well-liked man. Miserly, taciturn 
and often cruel, Eben had scorned even the 
basic social conventions and had seemed to pur- 
posefully foster the low esteem in which he was 
held, while squandering the sum of his love and 
money upon his young niece, Deborah. 

Deborah was a devastatingly beautiful young 
maiden of 26, whose manner was still refreshing- 
ly unsophisticated, for Eben's jealous protectivity 
allowed no sharers. Consequently, Deborah had 
always been carefully sheltered from society. As 
a matter of fact a minor legend had sprung up 
about the time Eben successfully defied the Fed- 
eral agent, who had sought to have Deborah 
enrolled in the local school. The older men stiil 
chuckled over the remembered sight of that hilari- 
ous chase. The frightened agent in the lead, fol- 
lowed closely by an enraged Eben, carrying his 
shotgun, with the slight figure of the petrified 
Deborah not far behind. Indeed, this incident 
typified Eben's desire to sacrifice all human con- 
tact so that he might devote himself more fully to 
the protection of his niece's interests and the 
molding of her young fife. 

But though Eben's death did not really affect 
anyone, save Deborah, materially, nobody quite 
escaped that icy chill of realization of their own 
mortality. Thus, while the preacher desperately 



strove for words to eulogize Eben's distasteful 
character and austere existence, and the town- 
folk busily prepared their Sunday best for the 
first community gathering since Martha Rebtree 
had passed away, a peculiar mixture of fear and 
worry ran through their minds. Here, they rea- 
soned, was a man whose valueless life was laid 
bare by the fact that his death had no mourners, 
but how could they be sure that their inevitable 
ends would have any other effect? Besides, Eben, 
at least, had left a tangible monument to his life 
in the form of Deborah. By devotedly attending 
to Deborah's needs, and carefully insulating her 
from outside influences since he had adopted the 
homeless orphan at an early age, Eben had nur- 
tured Deborah's shy and hermit-like manner 
which, it was said, so closely resembled Eben's 
own youthful personality. Yes, they thought, here 
was a man who had at least accomplished some- 
thing substantial in his ephemeral life. 

The funeral day was bright and clear. Folks 
had come from miles around to pay their re- 
spects to an elder, respected citizen and to hear 
what the harassed reverend had finally come up 
with. It was a fine funeral. The crowd listened 
attentively to the reverend's somewhat ambiguous 
eulogy, pityingly watched the re-orphaned Deb- 
orah break down in tears, admired the organist's 
virtuosity, and moved on, leaving the grief-strick- 
en niece by the grave of the man who had 
watched over her, for the course of her life. 

After a while, Deborah rose slowly and gazed 
thoughtfully at Eben's grave. Suddenly, Deborah 
impetuously spat on the grave of her protector 
and turned away to begin her life. 



87 



•"\ 



Pax et Bellum 



'Peace, peace is what I seek, and public calm: 
endless extinction of unhappy hates" 
—Matthew Arnold 



THE reverberant rap of the gavel resounded 
through the chamber. "Gentlemen, your most 
careful attention please," began the taut-faced 
nobly-statured speaker. "We are today faced with 
a reorganization problem of stupendous propor- 
tions. Nothing short of world consolidation will 
suffice to stop the attrition of our earth by the 
ghastly destructive forces of thermonuclear ener- 
gy. The paramount consideration, national and 
ideological animosities, demands our immediate 
resolution. I hold the language barrier singularly 
urgent; communication in idiom is crucial for 
full understanding between different peoples. This 



understanding is, in turn, mandatory if existing 
differences of opinion of political origin are to 
be ironed out." 

With his blood vessels throbbing and his voice 
grippingly intense, he continued. His audience 
sat steeped in silence . . . and concern. 

"The unification of different administrative, 
legislative and judicial functions presents less of 
a problem once the communication barrier is 
eliminated. Regional voting bureaus would de- 
termine the public stand on basic issues and 
scheduled debate could be used to clarify these 
issues. After codes of procedure are formulated, 
full-scale operation would begin. The many 
localized activities would gradually be absorbed 
into the new system. To maintain economic 
equilibrium during this transition, a Central Cur- 
rency Agency would insure proper elasticity and 
fluidity of money exchange. Ultimately, of course, 
currency will be standardized." 



c«c«««««:«<c««««««««c< 



88 



by CHARLES CANTOR 



"But President Ilia," interrupted a listener, his 
clearly enunciated words emerging from a dark 
corner, "you haven't yet explained how you pro- 
pose to solve the language problem." 

"Oh yes— thank you Mr. Utan. For the past 
few days Messrs. Sus and Poid have been prepar- 
ing a system in which grammar and vocabulary 
construction are reduced to simplicity itself. It 
employs a set of sixteen phonemes, twelve inde- 
pendent consonants and ten hand gesticulations 
and is extremely natural and therefore easy to 
learn. I hope to first train our brightest people, 
who, after achieving full facility with the new 
system, will teach it to others and so on— a sort 
of chain reaction. In this manner it will spread to 
all the people." He paused a moment, downed 
two heavy draughts from a pocket gourd, leaned 
forward on his stand and resumed speaking. His 
voice was softer and much lowered in pitch. It 
rose as he spoke. 



"Brothers, we must face it now. If we here are 
the only survivors of this past Third World War 
my whole plan is superfluous — but, we don't 
know if such is the case. That is why we are mov- 
ing out— it will be a long, hazardous search and 
will strain your endurance. 1 pray for your cour- 
age . . ." 

A pause then the speaker stepped down and 
passed through the crowd. 

Silence . . . everyone frozen in thought and 
apprehension. 

Out of the cave entrance and down the igneous 
hillside slowly filed the lonely earthmen. The 
morning mist swirled about President Gor Ilia 
leading his people through the ugly debris of 
atomic war. The flitting shapes of fog wound 
around Orang Utan, Rhe Sus and Anthro Poid 
walking in front. They were gazing at the gentle 
dawn— "to where beyond these voices there is 
peace." 




<«««« 



GUERNICA 

Courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art 



89 



HoHooti 




by SAUL HELFENBEIN 



"C 




OME here Puss." 
The cat tiptoed silently across the mound, 
its ebony fur resilient and resplendent under the 
black sky. It skimmed past the cauldron suspend- 
ed above a heap of glowing coals, and slipped 
into its mistress' lap. The witch stroked the cat's 
ruff until it fell asleep, purring sensuously and 
knowing one day it would awaken, a witch. 

Lecia, the witch's name— beautiful as she was 
ugly— picked up her sole companion and placed 
him near the coals. The cat, ruffled, opened its 
eye and watched her as she walked off to the 
edge of the mound. 

Lecia was now completely alone with her 
thoughts. She always awaited this hour with im- 
patience, for now she could let her mind wander 
at will without worrying whether Puss was prying 
into her thought. 

In a spasm of repulsion she drew her fingers 
over her face. "If only I were beautiful," she 
whispered. "If I could only stand to look at my- 
self for a moment without shuddering." The wind 
howled and reprimanded her for those thoughts. 
She pulled her cloak around her and wished for 
a full moon to free her from the suffocating iso- 
lation of the mound. Then she would evade her 
thoughts when all the sisters came together for 
one hour of mad revelry. 




-e- 



She sat down on the rim of the mound and 
closed her eyes. In a moment her imagination 
transferred the bleak heath into a verdant and 
opulent valley. Here Lecia was treading familiar 
ground, a new world into which she learned she 
could escape each night when her loneUness be- 
gan to strangle her. 

Whenever she was in the world that she had 
created, she flew through the heather then out 
onto the meadow and as she came upon the brook 
she was almost able to see herself. 

She suddenly opened her eyes horrified. Some- 
thing terrible had happened. Heretofore, her 
fancy always ended as she came upon herself— 
never actually seeing herself. But this time her 
imagination had overleaped itself and showed her 
what secret desire lay in her revery. She was a 
girl— the witch had changed into a human. 

As Lecia recovered her equilibrium, Puss start- 
ed up and meowed warningly. 

"Hush, cat," she said, and reached out to pat 
him. Puss backed away beyond her reach. "Stay 
there then and freeze for all I care." 

She bent over the cauldron and breathed in 
the strong pungent odors of the brew trying to 
clear her head, but the thought of being human 
kept tracing its way back to her. 



Then she stopped fighting this new impulse. 
For this had been the longing that had constantly 
been playing within her. Here was her chance to 
free herself of the loneliness that would forever 
surround her. Lecia scooped up a cup of the 
brew, intoned a final incantation, and drank. 

Puss hunched up his back, his fur bristling, his 
eyes burned with a black fire. He backed off and 
then sprang upon her, spitting and scratching. 
Then he turned and sped off into the darkness. 
Exhausted, Lecia fell into a faint beside the glow- 
ing coals. 

She awoke to raw cheerless morning. The coals 
had long since gone out and the cold pierced her 
body like a knife. The first sensation she experi- 
enced was fear and she began to run slowly at 
first, then faster and faster. 

When she finally stopped, she found herself 
staring into the smiling eyes of a girl with brown 
curls. The girl kissed Lecia's head and pressed 
her close to her heart. 

"We're going home," said the little girl. 

Then Lecia knew what had happened but she 
didn't care. She was experiencing another new 
sensation— love. 

"Look, mommy," said the little girl. "Look at 
the pretty pussycat." 




ROBBERY 






92 




by EDWARD LOWENSTEIN 



TTHE rain fell in solid piercing sheets. Joe Seeth 
' pulled his brown overcoat tighter about him 
in a vain effort to keep out the uncomfortable 
combination of a cold January wind and an icy 
winter rain. Looking once more at the clouded 
glass of the Ames Commercial Bank, Joe saw 
from his vantage point opposite it, that the three 
patrons who had just entered the small bank 
minutes before had not yet made their exit. 

He was nervous. The wind and the rain roared 
about him as a cold sweat dampened his young, 
lean body. Placing his shaking right hand into 
the deep pocket of his overcoat, he felt the cold 
steel of the .45 automatic. But even this, his 
omnipotent weapon, could not stay his courage. 
Joe tried to think of what he had eaten for lunch, 
and of the time he had been caught stealing gum 
from the candystore, and of the time he had gone 
to summer camp, and of a million other things. 
He could not fight off the realization that fear 
had taken hold of him. His left knee began to 
twitch spasmodically and uncontrollably. In a last 
effort to regain control of himself, Joe focused 
his full attention on the bank. He slowly rehearsed 
the plan he had first devised and then repeated 
to himself countless times: "I wait until it's a 



nasty day. I dress like a businessman in my good 
suit and coat, and carry a briefcase. I wait until 
nearly closing time when there aren't any cus- 
tomers in the bank. I walk into the bank, like I 
done it a million times, and go straight to the 
manager. The old guy will say to me, 'Can I help 
you, sir?' " Joe interrupted his thought at this 
point by chuckling softly at his own joke, as he 
had hundreds of times before. "And I'll say, 
'sure,' and take out my pistol. I'll tell him that I'm 
serious and that I wouldn't think twice about 
using the rod so he should do everything I tell 
him. I make him tie and gag the clerk. After he's 
finished I slug the old manager, not too hard, but 
hard enough. Then I take all that beautiful, beau- 
tiful money and scram. 

Joe Seeth's last words trailed off into a silence 
interrupted only by the beating of the rain on the 
pavement and the rushing of the wind. Seeth 
found himself breathing hard and in gasps. His 
heart was madly pounding against his chest and 
the sound of it deafened him. His legs felt weak, 
unable to carry their burden, and his face was 
contorted by a nervous twitch. At this moment, 
Joe knew that he couldn't go through with it. 



The closing of the bank door brought Joe back 
from his reverie to a reality of fear and panic. He 
looked up and noticed the three customers leav- 
ing. Before he realized what he was doing, Seeth 
found himself crossing the street with long, even 
strides. "What am I doing?" he thought to him- 
self, "I don't want to go to the bank! I don't want 
to go to the bank!" But his feet continued to carry 
him closer to the entrance. Joe opened the door, 
as he heard the words— "no, no, no" fall quietly 
from his lips. 

Tightly gripping the pistol as his fear mounted 
to an icy terror, Joe Seeth walked silently to the 
manager's desk. Strength was leaving his limbs. 
The empty brief case escaped the loose hold of his 
trembling fingers. With a dull thud it fell upon the 
highly polished bank floor. Through the greatest 
amount of effort, Seeth forced himself to bend 
down and pick it up. As his bleary eyes focused 
on the polished floor, he suddenly broke out into 
a maniacal paroxysm of frenzied laughter which 
filled the empty room. Joe Seeth did not hear the 
bank manager, bound hand and foot on the floor, 
say to him in a weak and pleading voice, "Help, 
help me, my bank has just been robbed!" 




93 



^k ^wumi &dT 






s/- 




by EDWARD LOWENSTEIN 

The sun shone hot and red, pale blue was the sky, 
The road was void and sear, the air was clear and dry, 
Trees and flowers and grass, birds and ants and things. 
Lived with the lust and joy this type of weather brings. 
On this road void and sear came a desolate man. 
Through this happy day he weeped — and all that a man can, 
During this day of life, he wished that he were dead. 
Begging and pleading with G-d, these were the words he said, 
"I'm tired of all the filth, 

I'm sick of all the dirt 

And hearing them say it's good 

What is only pain and hurt. 

Oh - it is but filth and dirt 

This thing that we call life. 

What should be love and peace 

Is made into hate and strife. 

Changed by man himself 
y With his will and greed and lust, 
•. ./■ i tried to reach the peaks. 

And was ground into the dust. 

So now dear loving G-d 

Please hear my lonely call. 

And let me come to you. 

Cleansed of the filth and all." 
The sun shone hot and red, pale blue was the sky. 
The road was void and sear, the air was clear and dry. 
Trees and flowers and grass, bifds and ants and things. 
Lived with the lust and joy this type of weather brings. 



;;^^ 



•-Ai'i- -""7.; •••••Vi: -V. •• 



'i\^:^ 









'3M-%)om SfUo^ 



by EDWARD LOWENSTEIN 



In the days of the old west, 
When bullets were the law, 
A two-gun cowboy bad-man 
Stood on a bar-room floor. 
He fired and shot his pistols 
Through the smoky air. 
"All you bums," he loudly said, 
"Get the Hell out'a here!" 

In minutes the place was cleared 

And all the bar was bare 

Except where sat an old man 

Without a trace of fear. 

The bad-man swaggered over, 

His face anger did tell. 

He stood before the seated man 

And to him did say "well." 

The old man at the bandit looked 

And sighed and said, "Sure was a 

Lot of "em, wasn't there?" 



94 



^'om^ ^k ^(jmiJt 



by WALTER REICH 




It masticates existence. 

It digests life, using it 

To nourish its opulent stores. 

Time is a glutton, and 

Time does not care. 

Cognizant of all, it refuses to see. 

It has no temptations and thus is heir to no evil. 

Indifferent to this — it fathoms no virtue: 

It lives for no reason other than its own, yet 

Time fears thought. 

Not man, but his searching brain 
Is what holds it in awe. Fleeting thoughts 
Overcome the 'Invincible'; the intellect 
Heeds no dimensions; it needs no duration 
For its pro-existent idea. Although 

Time rules life, 

Thought shall conquer it. 
That is its manifest destiny. 



'tl 






Spct^i Joi ^oe 



by STANLEY HORWITZ 



Joe Findlay was a simple man 
Who never wanted much, 

A wife, some kids, a bit of land, 
A little house and such. 

Joe had his wife, his kids, his land. 

All he sought, he got: 
Riches, power, position grand, 

Cadillac, and yacht. 

He thanked the Lord wholeheartedly 
For all he owned, each day 

For so much did he own, you see 
To keep it all, he prayed. 

A long, successful term, Joe spent 
On this weird world of ours. 

Without ever caring what he meant, 
Or wondering 'bout the stars 

No matter that he never knew 
Friendship, love, a cause. 

Majestic beauty, fresh morning dew 
Such trifles never gave him pause. 

So, my friend, wipe your tears away 
And comfort thus his kin — 

Joe Findlay did not die today 
For alive, he'd never been. 



S^ 






% 



# 



95 



Mhf} 



by DAVID EPSTEIN 



The air is calm above the village square 
And in the fields the simple people stand. 
And toiling sweating folk soon fill the air 
With happy chatter as they work the land. 

Then suddenly from out the cloudless sky 
With blinding speed and terrifying sound 
Come silver planes. With hardly chance 
To cry a warning, there they lie upon the ground. 

Then all is still. The women come to take 
The stiff, distorted, bloody bodies of 
Their men for burial. Their thin frames shake 
As they perform this final act of love. 

A child stands and watches with a sigh 
And as she watches simply wonders "Why?" 




3ri Swixk Oj).. 



bv WALTER REICH 



To hunt: for the answer among the shadows of 

deep despair. 
To seek: the response of eternity; 
To probe: the realities of these self-same 

"truths." 
To examine: that endearment which is etched 

on the conscience of the multitudes. 
To weigh: the balance of these scales 
And to Know . . . 




^k "Jwmd JLojd 



by DAVID EPSTEIN 

He stands upon the deck and with sad eyes 
He quickly scans the hazy distant sand. 
His body feels the constant fall and rise 
Of waves that take him to the Promised Land. 

Three years he"d spent within that hated place 
In constant fear of whip and black-gloved fist. 
Imprisoned there for no crime but his race — 
He bore the number yet upon his wrist. 

He's standing now upon the Sacred Earth. 
His soft and sad brown eyes with tears are damp. 
His hope's fulfilled — he's witnessed a rebirth 
Of freedom in his brethren's ancient camp. 

He prays his sorrows now at last will cease — 
He's ended now his troubled quest for peace. 





MERTISEMITS 



97 



CONGRATULATIONS 

to 

THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1959 

from 

THE PARENTS ASSOCIATION 



Mrs. A. B. Schnure President 

Mrs. A. S. Bursky Treasurer 

Mrs. N. Cohen Recording Secretary 

Mrs. D. Flamholz Corresponding Sec'y 



THE GENERAL ORGANIZATION 

of 

Yeshiva Universify High School 

of Brooklyn 

Congrc3tulates 

THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1959 

OFFICERS -FALL TERM 

Donald Goldmacher President 

David Lazar Vice-President 

Harold Leibowitz Secretary-Treasurer 

OFFICERS - SPRING TERM 

Joseph Rapaport President 

Harold Leibowitz Vice-President 

Bernard Lichtenstein Secretary-Treasurer 

Mr. Joseph B. Strum, Faculty Advisor 



Congratulations to 



AVRUM MARCUS 



from 

MOM and DAD 



BABI and ZEIDI 
AUNT LIL and UNCLE SOL 
AUNT ANN and UNCLE SAM 
AUNT FAYE and UNCLE LOU 
COUSINS HINDA and TANCHA 
AUNT MINNIE and UNCLE JOE 



AUNT GERTIE and UNCLE BEN 
AUNT LILLIE and UNCLE VICTOR 
AUNT ZELDA and UNCLE IZZIE 
AUNT MOLLIE and UNCLE DAVE 
AUNT CLARA and UNCLE LOU 
BROTHER HANK and SISTER SHARON 



and from ALL THE COUSINS 







JU 



T — 1 




MILTON GOTTESMAN 



from 



MOM, DAD and BUD 



Complimenfs of 

BNAI ISRAEL OF LINDEN HEIGHTS 

Dr. A. Werthheim - Rabbi 
Mr. J. Samuels, Pres. Mr. H. Weiss, Vice-Pres. 



Congrafulations fo 

THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1959 

from 

CLASS lA, 2A 



mfmrrmiim m mimiMI^W 



fi0ii ^\wmm miiii^BMtm 



THE ARISTA CHAPTER 

of 

THE NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 

Yeshiva University High School 
of Brooklyn 

Congrafulafes 

THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1959 

OFFICERS - FALL TERM 
Ray Bloch President 

David Jacobson Vice-President 

Stanley Horowitz Secrefary-Treosurer 

OFFICERS - SPRING TERM 
David Zomick President 

Stanley Horwitz Vice-President 

David Epstein Secrefory-Treosurer 




3££L££L.SuiLeh±. 



Bff^/^Y'js 




muiiiiiwiiM 



i_-. . 






I 1- 



niiiiiiiminuiinin 



hiycji^itfl 



i 




99 



Congratulations to . 



ALEXANDER ROSNER 



from 



MOM and DAD 






ftw:2- f t 




100 



Congratulations to 



ALEX ROSNER 

from 

BERNARD MOSKOVITS 

Rua Atlantica 44 
Sao Paulo, Brasil 





101 



Congratulations to 



ALEXANDER ROSNER 



from 



ERNEST MOSKOVITZ 

1964 Brasil Avenue 

Sao Paulo ; 



and 



ZOLTAN MOSKOVITZ 

99 Wall Street 
New York City 



and 



GENCOMEX TRADING CO. 




^BHUI^DB 







U)-2 



Congratulations to . . . 

LARRY SCHECHTER 

from 

MOM and DAD 

GRANDPA and GRANDAAA 

MR. and MRS. DAVID FEICH 

MR. and MRS. DAVID NUSSBAUM 

MR. and MRS. HY SALOMON 

WM. L. BUMBERG CO. 
ROOFERS & STOVE REPAIR SUPPLY CORP. 



Congratulations to . 



HERBERT ADELMAN 



from 



MOM, DAD and SEYMOUR 




103 



Congratulations to 



DAVID JACOBSON 

from 

MOM and DAD 

ROSA-LEE and JOSEPH 

GRANDMA and GRANDPA 

AUNT YETTA and UNCLE LOU 

DEBBY and ISRAEL 

AUNT SOSIA and UNCLE ALTER 

AUNT IRENE 

UNCLE NAT 

AUNT BERLA and UNCLE MURRAY 

ANN and LOU JAFFE 

AUNT PERLA, UNCLE MURRAY and ALLEN 

JULIUS and REBECCA COOPER and FAMILY 

MR. and MRS. SHANGOLD 

1 1 Belmont Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Congratulations to 



GEROLD HALPERN 

from 

MOM, DAD and EVELYN 
SPILKY, KAPLAN and SCHNELL 
MR. and MRS. S. FRANKEL 
MR. and MRS. MARTIN KLEIN 

KLEIN MEATS 
1203 Avenue J 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 




104 



Congratulations to . . 



EDWARD LEIBOWITZ 

from 

MOTHER and FATHER 

BROTHER ROBERT 

SISTER AAAXINE 

BROTHER-IN-LAW JERRY 

UNCLE MORRIS and AUNT EMMA WEISSMAN 

GRANDMOTHER SARA PECKMAN 

GRANDMOTHER NATA LEIBOWITZ 



Congratulations to . . . 

JEROME GOLDSTEIN 

from 

MOM and DAD and SEYMOUR 
THE BROOKDALE FOUNDATION 
MR. and MRS. JACOB FELBAUM 



MAMMOUTH SERVICE STATION 
633 New York Avenue 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



LOUIS BERYL - INSURANCE 
76 William Street 
New York City 



LEGRAND CHEMICAL CORP. 
103 -50th Street 
Brooklyn 32, N. Y. 




105 



Congratulations to 



IRWIN HAIMS 

from 

MOM and DAD 
CALVIN and GAIL 

MR. J. DROZEN 



Congratulations to . . . 

MICHAEL MESHENBERG 



from 

MOM, DAD and CARL 

GRANDMA and GRANDPA 

AUNT RUDY and STUART 

AUNT SILVIA and UNCLE HOAGY 

AUNT NAOMI and UNCLE HARRY 

AUNT MIRIAM and UNCLE SID 

AUNT MULU and UNCLE WALLY 

HYMENS PHARMACY 
13th Ave. and 51st St. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

BETH ISRAEL CENTER 
56th St. and 11th Ave. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



MAPLE LAKE CAMP 
Livingston Manor, N. Y. 

BUDDY LEE 

570 Fulton Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 




Congratulations to . . . 

ALEX FLAMHOLZ 

from 

MOM, DAD, JOEL and JACKIE AUNT MOLLIE and UNCLE ARTHUR 

AUNT FANNIE and UNCLE MORRIS EDYTHE and HY 

AUNT BERTHA and UNCLE MAX SYLVIA and ABE 

Cousins: ROCHELLE, BETH, JETH and JONATHAN 
MR. and MRS. SAM SILVERSTEIN MR. SAM SALL 



Congratulations to 



DAVID SPERLING 

from 

MOM and DAD 

GRANDMA 

MR. LEE WITZET 

MRS. A. EHRLICH 

MR. and MRS. ABRAHAM FREEDMAN 

MR. and MRS. HERMAN DAVERMAN 

KINOR DAVID 
MEAT POULTRY CORP. 




-bI^ 




107 





CONGRATULATIONS 




to 


CONGRATULAT IONS 


BERT SIROTE 


to 


from 




Grandpa and Uncle Morris 


EDWARD LOWENSTEIN 


Aunt Mary and Uncle Irving 




Aunt Lilly and Uncle Ben 




Aunt Tillie and Uncle Harry 


from 


Aunt Ruthy and Uncle Don 




Aunt Libby and Uncle Jake 


MOM and DAD 


Aunt Dora and Uncle Nehemiah 
Cousins Irene and Al 


ELAINE and PAUL 


Cousins Roberta and Danny 




Cousins Toby and Arnie 


GINGER 


Bobby and Morris Yarmak 




and 




Cousins Irwin, Burton, Melvin, Bernard, Susan, 




Bruce, Bernie and Richie 



Congratulations to . . . 

HARVEY ABRAMOWITZ 

from 

MOM and DAD 

ARNOLD 

LEONARD 

CECILLE 

RONA 

WENDY 

SCOHY 

His Friends at 

MAX BOGEN AND CO. 
ZWEIG FURS 
SOBEL FURS 
MOSDEN STAMP CO. 
BARNEIT AND WEITZNER FURS 
SOCIETY OF ISRAELI PHILATELISTS 
SOCIETY OF PHILATELIC AMERCANS 
MINTZ AND SCHWAM FURS 




lOS 



CONGRATULAT IONS 




to 


CONGRATULAT IONS 


JOSEPH LEIBOWITZ 


to 




STANLEY HOROWITZ 


from 






from 


MOM and DAD 




ZEDIE MAX BRICKNER 


MOM and DAD 


MAXINE & MORTY MAX STILERMAN 


ZEIDI JOYCE & HANS 


JACOB WATTON LOUIS WALDMAN 


UNCLE HARRY and AUNT ROSE 


JAY JACKMAN 





Congrafulations to 



DAVID ZOMICK 



MOM and DAD 
LAURETTE, ELLIOT, TRUDY 
GRANDMA and GRANDPA BURG 
HONEY, NAT, BOBBY, LEE and KAREN 
JOE, SALLY, SHELDON and LARRY 
ROSE SMITH 
DR. FRANK BASS 
DR. SAMUEL SCHIFF 

MR. and MRS. S. ALTMAN 

MESSRS. PERLSTEIN and HALPERN 

MESSRS. GREENSTEIN and RITTER 

DURAWOOL INC. SEYMOUR LESSER 

Queens Village, N. Y. 1 16-55 Queens Boulevard 

Dura Soap Pads® Forest Hills, N. Y. 

Steel Wool 




109 



Congratulations to . . . 

LARRY WACHSMAN 

from 

MR. and MRS. JOSEPH B. WACHSA^AN, - Parents 

RAPHAEL, PHILIP and SHERYL WACHSMAN 

RABBI and MRS. JOSEPH T. RUDMAN 

MR. and MRS. REUBEN M. RUDMAN and ZAVE 

MR. and MRS. DAVID WACHSMAN 

MRS. BERTHA GOODMAN 

MR. and MRS. I. FRIEDAAAN and SON 

MR. and MRS. M. FRIEDMAN and FAMILY 

MR. and MRS. BENJAMIN BLOOM and FAMILY 

MR. and MRS. STANLEY H. SCHNEIER 

JOSEPH BERMAN - /NSURANCE 

1014 Neilson Street 

FarRockaway 91, N. Y. 



CONGRATULAT/ONS 



to 



ROBERT LEVINE 

from 



MOM and DAD 



Hershes Knish Shop 
Kova Quality Hatters 
Erasmus Typewriter Shop 
Blatt's Department Store 
Hochberg Bros. 
Elegante Shop 
Land's Knish Shop 
Sach's and Mendelson 
Sid & Pauline Candy Store 
M. Schleifer 



EDDY'S — School Supplies 
2273 Church Avenue 



C O N G R A T U L A T / O N S 
to 

MARVIN POLLACK 

from 

MOM and DAD 

Uncle Lou, Aunt Alice and Mike 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Strickler and Family 

Mr. and Mrs. B. Ingber and Family 



DRIGGS POULTRY CO. 

349 Jefferson Street 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



GOTLIB WHOLESALE MEATS 

4904 Church Avenue 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

PATERSON TALLOW CO. 
Paterson, N. J. 




110 



Congratulations to . . . 

MARK NATHANSON 

from 

MOM and DAD 

AUNT FANNIE and UNCLE NAT and LARRY and JACK 

AUNT CLARA, UNCLE PHIL and HARVEY 

AUNT REGGIE and UNCLE BOB 

THE MAIDENBAUMS 

THE LEVITTS 

MET. FOOD CO. 

DAVE'S FRUIT AAARKET 

MONTY'S GARAGE 

MARSHALL LEON BLOOM 
and SNOWBALL 



CONGRATULAT/ONS 


CONGRATUIAT/ONS 


to 


fo 


DAVID EPSTEIN 


BUDDY 


from 


from 


MOM and DAD 


MOM, DAD and ARTIE 


GRANDMA IDA FREIMAN 


AUNT HERMIA - UNCLE SY 


AAARK, GARY and GAIL 


ANDY, DAVID and MIKE 




111 



JOE SPINELLA'S 
ALBEMARLE 
RECREATION 

975 Flatbush Avenue 

Brooklyn 26, N. Y. 

BU. 4-9528 



JOE SPINELLA'S 

KENMORE 

BOWLING LANES 

2228 Church Avenue 

Brooklyn 26, N. Y. 

- OPEN 24 HOURS - 

IN 2-9734 



-COMPLETELY AUTOMAT IC- 
Complimenis of 

DENIS-MARCUS, Inc. 

Converfers of Rayons 
469 SEVENTH AVENUE 
Nevi' York 1 8, New York 



Compliments of 
JOSEPH A. KLEIN 


Complimenfs of 


& SON 


STANDARD 


Insurance Since 7922 


PAPER BOX CO. 


30 Clinton Street 
Newark, N. J. 


515 Greenwich Street 
New York, N. Y. 



Congrofu/at/ons to 

RAY BLOCH 

from 

MOM and DAD 

GRANDAAA 
LEE and ZACK 



Congratulations to 



LAWRENCE HASPEL 

from 
MOM and DAD 

ond 
BROTHERS AARON and ABE 




112 



Congratulations to . . . 

HERBERT TANOWITZ 

from 

MOM and DAD 

CYNTHIA and HERB 

HELEN, JULIUS, STANLEY and ANDREA 

AUNT SARAH and FAMILY 

HEWES STREET LIVE POULTRY MARKET 

JACOB RIFKIN, INC. 

APEX UTILITIES 

MR. and MRS. A. GRON and FAMILY 

MR. and MRS. WM. ROTHANDLER 

DR. and MRS. PAUL MANN 



Congratulafions fo 

JOEL BERKOWITZ 

from 
MOM and DAD 
Grandmas Berk and Stein 
Hal, Roz, Emily and Jeff 
Louise and Arthur 
Uncle Julie and Aunt Miriam 
Uncle Jack and Aunt Ethel 
Uncle Matt and Aunt Gurt 



Congratulations to 
BROTHER DON 

from 

Sheila, Shelly and Baby Paul 



Congratulations to 

ABRAHAM CHAIM AUFRICHTIG 

On His Graduation 

from 

Jacob Wiedenbaum 



Congratulafions fo 

MARTIN BRAUN 

from 

MOM and DAD 
Sondra Grandma 

Celie and Larry Mr. Sigmund Weiss 

Leon and Milton OhI 




113 



IN LOVING MEMORY 



of 



JOSEPH SIROTE ny 

by 

MRS. BETTY SIROTE 

and Children 

BERT - RITA - ALAN 



Congrafutafions to 




HOWARD LIEBMAN 


CONGRATULAT/ONS 


from 


*o 


FRIENDS 






DAVID RESNICK 




from 


Congraiulafions fo 




THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1959 


Mom, Dad and Eph 


from 


Aunt Lilly and Uncle Harry 


LOUIS BECKER 




UNION AUTOMATIC MUSIC 


and Family 


2801 OCEAN AVENUE 




Brooklyn, N. Y. 






114 





P. B. G. 






Congrafulafes Ifself 


C O N G /? A 7 U L A T / O N S 


RAY 


LOWEY 


to 


LOLA 


LEROY 




BUD 


RAPPY 


DAVID LAZAR 


EPPY 


DAVE 1 




AJAX 


GABE 


from 


HOWIE 


SINNY 




SAUL 


BERT 


Rabbi and Mrs. Emanuel Lazar 


HARRIS 
JAKEY 


MIKE 
DAVE II 


Rabbi and Mrs. A. Klein 


AAARTY 


JOSH 


Eli 


JOEY 


SAM 




BIG ABE 






Compliments of . . . 

CONGREGATION SHOMREl EMUNAH 


Congraiulations to . . . 

PAUL PUTTER 




5202 ■ 14th AVENUE 


from 
MOM and DAD 




Brooklyn 19, N. Y. 


PUTTER FAMILY 


Congratulat 


ons (o . . . 


Congratu/o/tons to . . . 




SAUL HELFENBEIN 


NAGY ASSOCIATES 




from 






MOM and DAD 


FOOD BROKERS 


Mr, Nathan 


Housman Dr. and Mrs. Nathan Muchnick 
Mauzone Home Kosher Products 


New York, N. Y. 



Congrafvlafions to . . . 

NAT STERNBERG 

frojn 
MOM, DAD and GRANDPARENTS 



Congratvlations to . . . 

IRVING FEIGENBLUM 

^rom 

CHIFFON BAKERY 

1375 Coney Island Ave. Brooklyn, N. Y. 



T 



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\1Ui*f^ auiLai^ 




mminmMx wwniwmnWtuun 




115 



Congrafulations to . . ■ 

MYRON SOKAL 

from 

MOM and DAD 

CLATTER FOOD MARMOR and APPEL 

Congrafu/afions io . . . 

MOISHE FEDER 

from 
MR. and MRS. B. FEDER MR. and MRS. INGBER 

MRS. ESTHER WEINTRAUB ABRAHAM TAYER 

Congrafulations to . . . 

MOISHE FEDER 

irom 
CONG. TIFERETH ISRAEL OF MAPLETON PARK 



CONGRATULATIONS 



LARRY WACHSMAN 

from 

MR. and MRS. 
EMANUEL STERN 



Congratulations to . . . 

TULLY DERSHOWITZ 

from 
MOM and DAD 
AVI SHICK BAKERY 

CongraJu/ofions fo . . . 

MARTIN KELLMAN 

from 
MOM, DAD and IRA 

Congratulations to . . . 

MICHAEL ROSENBAUM 

irom 

MOM and DAD 



CONGRATUIAT IONS 






fo 

OBIE GOLDBLATT 

irom 

Mom, Dad and Shulameth 

Raphael and Frimet Goldblatt 

Foundation 




116 



ARCOLA PLUMBING & HEATING, Inc. 



221 BUFFALO AVENUE 



SLocum 6-7600 



Brooklyn 13, N. Y. 



BELLMAN BAKERY, Inc. 



131-09 - 101st AVENUE 



Richmond Hill, N. Y. 



Compliments of . 



BLOOM PACKING CO. 



CONGRA TULATIONS 
fo 

PHILIP and NORMAN BERSSON 

from 
DAD, MOTHER and ROBERT 
GRANDPA and GRANDMA LEVITON 
GRANDPA BERSSON 

UNCLE SOL and AUNT BELLA 

UNCLE JOE, AUNT PAULINE and PHYLLIS 




Congratulations lo . . . 



JOSH WERBLOWSKY 

from 

MOTHER, DAD, VELVEL and SUSAN 



Congrafulations to . . . 

HOWARD FRUCHTER 



MOM and DAD 
AARON, IRVING and LAZER 



Compliments of . . . 

SERENE CITY 

8524 AVENUE L 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



CONGRATULAT/ONS 
fo 

SIMEON FENSTERHEIM 

from 
MOM, DAD and EDYTHE 
GRANDMOTHER 

UNCLE HARRY and AUNT MOLLY 
UNCLE MOE and AUNT SHIRLEY 
UNCLE HENRY and AUNT HELEN 
UNCLE LOUIS and AUNT MOLLY 
UNCLE MORRIS and AUNT ADELINE 




Congratulations to 

ARTHUR B. WOLFISH 

from 

Mom, Dad, Paul, and Roslyn 

Uncle Marty, Aunt Frances, Al and Mel 

Uncle Sol and Aunt Sophie 

Uncle Sidney, Aunt Lena, and Sharon 

Mrs. A. Rosenblatt and Henry 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Yivrakes 

Mr. and Mrs. Herman Stern 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Eger 



Congratu/afions to 

ALAN YACKOW 

from 

Mother — Dad 

Bernard 



In Loving Memory of 



MY BELOVED WIFE 



ROSA WEINBERG ny 



by 



DR. AARON WEINBERG 



Congratulations to 

HAROLD LEIBOWITZ 

from 

Mom — Dad 
Elihu and Reuben Simcha 



Congratulations to 


MELVIN 


SINOWITZ 




from 


MOM 




DAD 




BUBIE 




ZEIDIE 




NORMAN 



In Memory of 



OUR DEAR GRANDPARENTS 



GHANA and SHLOMO LASK ny 



by 



VIVIAN and MYRON SOKAL 




118 



MALKIN APPLIANCES 

1962 Fulton Street Brooklyn 33, N. Y. 

MAISON CHARLES 

567 Fiatbush Avenue Brooklyn, N. Y. 

LOWEN'S BAKE SHOP 

311 Rogers Avenue Brooklyn 25, N. Y. 

PARISIEN CATERERS 

4502 - 9th Avenue Brooklyn, N. Y. 

FARMFOOD RESTAURANT 

271 W. ii9th Street New York, N. Y. 

BORO FUEL OIL CO. 

Licensed & Bonded Oil & Healing Controctors 
2 Church Avenue Brooklyn 18, N. Y. 

Congrotu/ations to . . . 

ALFRED MUNZER 

from 
MOM and DAD 
(RABBI WEISS 



Complimenis of . . 



B. MANISCHEWITZ CO. 

JERSEY CITY 2, N. J. 



Congrotu/ations to . . . 

HERBIE YOSKOWITZ 

from 

MOM, DAD and JOEY 

GRANDMA and GRANDPA 



COLONY HARDWARE SUPPLY CORP. 

307 Brighton Beach Avenue Brooklyn 35, N. Y. 

SKLAR & LEVITAN 

474 Albany Avenue Brooklyn 13, N. Y., 

SIDNEY B. KATZ 

Optometrist 
4405 - 13th Avenue Brooklyn 19, N. Y. 

PARK LANE DAIRIES 

457 Wortman Avenue Brooklyn 8, N. Y. 

BROOKLYN AUTO SALES 

45th St. & 18th Ave. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

WEBER'S — BEER and SODA 

Good Health Seltzer — o— Home Deliveries Our Speciaify 
56-48 - 185th Street Fresh Meadows, L. I. 

Congrofu/otions to . . . 

MARTIN SHAPIRO 

from 

MOM and DAD 

BERNARD KRITZ ABIE MEHLER 

HEBREW BUTCHER WORKERS UNION 
LOCAL 234 

AFL - CIO 



Congratulations to . . . 

MARTY F E LDM AN 

from 

MOM and DAD 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Scher Mr. and Mrs. I. Stein 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Olarnik 




119 



Comptiments of . . , 

EMBASSY EQUITIES 

287 BRIGHTON BEACH AVE. 
Brooklyn 35, N. Y. 

Complimenis of . . . 

DAN'S SUPREME SUPER MARKET, Inc. 

23 LITTLE /AAIN STREET 
Hempstead, L. I. 

Tfionics fo . . . 

— Sara, Jolly, Rhoda, Bobbi 

from 
THE EDITORS 



Congratulations to . . . 


DON 

from GABE 








Congratulations to . . . 


G AB E 

from DON 








Best Wishes to . . . 

DONALD 








from AUNT GUSSIE and UNCLE MORRIS 






MALLORY CLEANERS 






5505 Glenwood Road 




Brooklyn 34, 


N. 


Y. 


ALBEN 


FOOD 


CORP. 






777 Stone Avenue 




Brooklyn 


N. 


Y. 



BAYWAY GARAGE SERVICE STATION 

231 Neptune Avenue Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Best Wisfies to . . . 

STEVEN FEI GELSTOCK 

from 

MOM and DAD 

MR. SOLOMAN SUPER PAK CO. 



Compliments of . . . 

SUMMER HEAT FUEL OIL 



8730 - 18th AVENUE 



MR. JACK TARULLI 



Congratulations to . . , 

GABRIEL SALZMAN 

from 
MOM, DAD and ABBY 



Congratulaiions to . . . 




DONALD 




from THE LIEBMANS 




Congratulations to . . . 




LEROY LUNDNER 




from MOM, DAD and MIRIAM 




PEARL FABRICS 




1 1 1 Eldridge Street New York 


City 


FINE G LO 




9 Eldridge Street Nev^ York City 


LEBENDIGER TEXTILES 




113 Eldridge Street New York 


City 



NACO FABRICS 

92 Eldridge Street New York City 




120 



MR. and MRS. PHILLIP SILVERSTEIN 

CAPITOL CANDY CO. 

BEST SALES CORP. 

BERGER BROS. 

HANDELT SEIDENBERG 

RUDY ELEPHANT 

LEWIS & WOLKIND, INC. 

MOE SHULMAN 

JACK & GEORGE'S STATIONERY STORE 

SID SHERMAN 

KESSLER & KESSLER FURS 

TIV-TOV STORE, INC. 

HAUT'S MEAT MARKET 

L. SCHNEIDER 

M & M FUR AID 

FRED STRAUSS & SON 

HOWARD TEXTILES 

MAX KANDEL 

JULIUS KRUSKEL 

BERNSTEIN, SALAND & SPARBAR 

BERNSTEIN & WEISS 

ARMAND FRIED 

LEVINE & FROMAN 

FRED STRAUSS & SON 

POLARIZING FUR 

MOSKOWITZ & GROSS 



HAROLD LEVINE 

MAX TRESSER 

MR. and MRS. MELVIN SHERAK 

FRIED FAMILY 

GAYER PHARMACY 

DATZ CHEMIST 

JACK BARON 

ROSEN'S FOOD STORE 

ORCHARD FARMS 

PHILIP KRAMER & BROS. 

JACK SEGAL 

REDHILL CONSTRUCTION CO. 

ADEL LESIN 

J. GOLDSMITH 

H. KING 

MR. and MRS. LOUIS SHIFFMAN 

MR. and MRS. MAX GORDON 

BORO FLAG CO. 

KATZ 

FRIEDMAN'S FOOD DEPARTMENT 

SARA 

JOLLY 

RHODA 

BOBBI 

MR. CALLANS GIN MILL 

FINK'S ZOO 




121 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 



HARVEY ABRAMOWITZ, 1847 E. 7th Street ES 6-5563 

HERBERT ADELMAN, 1530 E. 18th Street NI 5-1 154 

ABRAHAM AUFRICHTIG, 358 Montgomery Street PR 8-6043 

JOEL BERKOWITZ, 1806 Avenue M ES 5-2620 

NORMAN BERSSON, 1 141 Nelson Street, Far Rockaway FA 7-3821 

PHILIP BERSSON, 1 141 Nelson Street, Far Rockaway FA 7-3821 

RAPHAEL BLOCH, 1408 Carroll Street SI 6-4922 

MARTIN BRAUN, 1 165-50th Street GE 5-5082 

CHARLES CANTOR. 2121 Beekman Place IN 2-3 1 89 

NATHAN DERSHOWITZ, 1551 -48th Street H Y 4-7720 

ARNOLD EAGLE, 372 Hungry Harbor Road, Valley Stream PY 1-9253 

DAVID EPSTEIN, 63 Pomona Avenue, Newark, N. J. WA 6-5073 

MOISHE FEDER, 2038-61st Street DE 1-4780 

STEVEN FEIGELSTOCK, 3130 Brighton 7th Street NI 8-1649 

IRVING FEIGENBLUM, 2058 E. 9th Street NI 5-1 126 

MARTIN FELDMAN, 583 Linwood Street AP 7-5887 

SIMEON FENSTERHEIM, 781 Ocean Avenue BU 2-7021 

ALEX FLAMHOLZ. 942 Brooklyn Avenue UL 6-1835 

HOWARD FRUCHTER, 1 126-5 1st Street UL 3-8153 

ROBERT GERSTL, 154 Rockaway Parkway PR 2-4876 

OBIE GOLDBLATT, 564 Montgomery Street PR 4-2019 

DAVID GOLDKRANTZ, 184 Clarkson Avenue BU 4-4328 

HYMAN GOLDKRANTZ, 919 Saratoga Avenue DI 6-2663 

DONALD GOLDMACHER, 141 E. 94th Street SI 6-1 159 

JEROME GOLDMAN, 3036 Brighton 5th Street SH 3-9357 

JEROME GOLDSTEIN, 735 Belmont Avenue AP 7-5548 

MILTON GOTTESMAN, 864-49th Street UL 4-5796 

IRWIN HAIMS, 1687-54th Street UL 1-6799 

GEROLD HALPERN, 506 Eastern Parkway PR 8-4172 

LARRY HASPEL, 1002 Foster Avenue UL 9-0165 




SAUL HELFENBEIN, 1 1 6 Neptune Avenue NI 6-7307 

STANLEY HORWITZ, 305 Linden Boulevard BU 4-3591 

DAVID JACOBSON, 1776 Union Street SL 6-8541 

MARTIN KELLMAN, 1036 Washington Avenue IN 2-5415 

DAVID LAZAR, 683 Essex Street CI 7-1465 

EDWARD LEIBOWITZ, 1430-51st Street HY 4-95 14 

HAROLD LEIBOWITZ, 205 1 -79th Street BE 6-0 1 84 

JOSEPH LEIBOWITZ, 386 E. 46th Street PR 4-2532 

ROBERT LEVINE, 5423-12th Avenue GE 6-2478 

BERNARD LICHTENSTEIN, 8201 -19th Avenue BE 6-2476 

HOWARD LIEBMAN, 2263 E. 29th Street NI 6-6458 

ABRAHAM LOSHINSKI, 1538-47th Street GE 8-7743 

EDWARD LOWENSTEIN, 1376 E. 13th Street NI 5-5783 

LEROY LUNDNER, 6801 Bay Parkway BE 2-7974 

AVRUM MARCUS, 560 Williams Avenue HY 8-2159 

MICHAEL MESHENBERG, 1569-50th Street HY 4-9548 

REUBEN MEZRICH, 1242-47th Street UL 4-5434 

ALFRED MUNZER, 2133 E. 22nd Street NI 6-4990 

MARK NATHANSON, 1337-48th Street GE 5-5723 

MARVIN POLLACK, 675 Willoughby Avenue HY 1-9201 

PAUL PUTTER, 233 Chester Street DI 5-4239 

JOSEPH RAPAPORT, 398 E. 94th Street DI 6-5489 

DAVID RESNICK, 148-25-89th Avenue, Jamaica J A 6-4517 

MICHAEL ROSENBAUM, 401 Schenectady Avenue SL 6-7925 

ALEXANDER ROSNER, 1725 E. 27th Street DE 9-4141 

GABRIEL SALZMAN, 2818 Quentin Road NI 5-7565 

LAWRENCE SCHECHTER, 581 Essex Street DI 5-4583 

MARTIN SHAPIRO, 1527 St. Johns Place PR 8-6780 

MELVIN SINOWITZ, 3024 Avenue W SH 3-5425 

BERT SIROTE, 4305- 1 5th Avenue GE 5-7470 

MYRON SOKAL, 1209 E. 7th Street BE 6-8919 

DAVID SPERLING, 938-5 1st Street GE 8-37 1 6 

NAT STERNBERG, 355 Lefferts Avenue HY 8-4865 

GABRIEL SZEGO, 1352-47th Street UL 4-1638 

HERBERT TANOWITZ, 247 E. 91st Street DI 6-5330 

LARRY WACHSMAN, 2232 Collier Avenue, Far Rockaway FA 7-3323 

MORTON WALDMAN, 309 E. 48th Street PR 2-8845 

JOSHUA WERBLOWSKY, 675 Empire Boulevard HY 3- 1 1 72 

BERNARD WITKIN, 8718-24th Avenue ES 3-7462 

ARTHUR WOLFISH, 256 Schenectady Avenue PR 8-6034 

ALAN YACKOW, 7705 Bay Parkway TE 7-4 1 99 

HERBERT YOSKOWITZ, 1012-44th Street GE 8-3969 

DAVID ZOMICK, 1602 Carroll Street IN 7-0024 




123 




"It's really a wonder I haven't dropped all my ideals, because they 
seem so absurd and impossible to carry out. Yet I keep them 
because, in spite of everything, I still believe people are good at 
heart. ... I see the world gradually becoming a wilderness, I hear 
the ever-approaching thunder, which will destroy us too. I can feel 
the sufferings of millions, and yet, if I look up into the heavens, 
I think that . . . this cruelty, too, will end. . . ." 

FROM Anne Frank 



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PHOTOS BY LORSTAN STUDIOS 



124 




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